New Products

CADBW Updates rent yacht Miami
Miami Beach yacht rentals


Lake Mead Forever Resorts: Click Here

Willow Beach Forever Resorts: Click Here


Tour Clare: Click Here
Advertise with AZBW
Swim Platforms: Click Here
Marine Services Mark Silvey: Click Here
Tailfeather_Inn_Ad5.jpg: Click Here
Swim Platforms: Click Here
Latest Issue: Click Here
Wide World Of Maps: Click Here
Hampton Inn Lake Havasu: Click Here
Advertise with AZBW
Crane Rental: Click Here
Desert Palm Dentistry: Click Here
Life Safer Personal Retriever: Click Here
Maritime Institute: Click Here
Outdoors Arizona Radio: Click Here
Sail Havasu: Click Here
DeScale-It Products: Click Here
Dirty Drummer Scottsdale: Click Here
Bartlett Lake Marina: Click Here
images/Get_em_SF_Sept09.jpg: Click Here
Advertise with AZBW
Swim Platforms: Click Here

CADBW Updates

Get The Latest California Boating Information

STATE OF CALIFORNIA
DEPARTMENT OF BOATING AND WATERWAYS
2000 Evergreen Street, Suite 100
Sacramento, California 95815
Gloria Sandoval, Department of Boating and Waterways
(916) 263-0788
(916) 715-1657 cell
gsandoval@dbw.ca.gov

Troy Swauger, Department of Fish and Game, 916-322-8932
Roy Stearns, Department of Parks and Recreation, 916-654-2270
Pete Weisser, Department of Water Resources, 916-653-3350
Steve Lyle, Department of Food and Agriculture, 916-654-0462




DBW Staff, Stakeholders and Commissioners:
The following message is on behalf of Janelle Beland, Undersecretary for Natural Resources Agency.

I am pleased to inform you that Sylvia Ortega Hunter was sworn in on Friday, March 1, 2013 as the chief deputy director for the Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW). Sylvia has also been designated as acting director of the department. Her roles are effective immediately. Sylvia comes with over 30 years of state service, and has served in the areas of auditing, budgeting, and program management. She has been with DBW for the past three years leading the Loan and Grants Program, and previously worked at numerous state agencies including the Department of Corrections, the Department of General Services, and the Department of Water Resources.

This is an important and exciting time for the Natural Resources Agency and DBW, as the merger with the Department of Parks and Recreation moves forward. Sylvia has been part of the integration team since last fall, and her leadership and enthusiasm will help make this a smooth transition while also ensuring that Boating and Waterways continues to provide critical services and programs for the boaters of California and those that visit our state’s waterways.

Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird and all of the staff at the Natural Resources Agency look forward to working closely with Sylvia, the staff of DBW, and all of the stakeholders in the coming weeks and months.

Sincerely,
Janelle Beland
Undersecretary for Natural Resources




Boat Safely this Memorial Day Weekend
Wear a Life Jacket and Avoid Alcohol

Sacramento, Calif. – The California Department of Boating and Waterway’s (DBW) urges boaters to be properly prepared for safe boating this Memorial Day weekend. California’s waterways will be crowded with motorized and non-motorized vessels. People will boat in groups creating numerous distractions, which can have deadly consequences.

“Boating during Memorial Day weekend means being a more responsible boat operator,” said DBW’s acting Director Lucia Becerra. Operators may have people on board their vessels who do not normally boat. Familiarizing passengers with the location of safety equipment and how to be safe aboard will decrease the likelihood of being involved in a boating accident.

Below are some ways in which boat operators can decrease the chances of being involved in a boating accident:

Wear a life jacket.

Avoid alcohol. Everyone who drinks alcohol on board is at risk. Passengers can easily fall overboard, swim near the propeller, or cause vessels to capsize.

Designate a person aboard the vessel to help you act as a lookout.

Carry the required safety equipment such as fire extinguishers, sound signals, navigation lights, and life jackets for every person on board.

Inform everyone on board where the required safety equipment is located.

Turn off the engine when the boat is not moving to avoid propeller injuries.

Detailed information about this information and additional life saving tips can be found in boating safety courses or at www.BoatResponsibly.com.




SAN FRANCISCO, September 13, 2011

Study Predicts Sea Level Rise May Take Economic Toll On California Coast

California beach towns could face hefty economic losses caused by sea level rise in the next century, according to a new state-commissioned study conducted by economists at San Francisco State University. The study forecasts the economic impact of sea level rise on five communities: Ocean Beach in San Francisco; Venice Beach and Malibu in Los Angeles; Carpinteria in Santa Barbara County; and Torrey Pines State Reserve in San Diego County.

Funded by the California Department of Boating and Waterways, the study examines the cost of coastal storm damage and erosion, both of which are expected to increase as sea levels rise. It also forecasts the economic impact of sea level rise on tourism and natural habitats, as beaches that have been narrowed by erosion lose their appeal to visitors and their ability to sustain wildlife.

The results suggest that visitor hotspots like Venice Beach could lose up to $440 million in tourism revenue between now and 2100 if sea levels rise by 4.6 feet (1.4 meters), a projection specific to the California coast, based on recent scientific studies. At San Francisco's Ocean Beach, accelerated erosion could cause up to $540 million worth of damage.

"Sea level rise will send reverberations throughout local and state economies," said Philip King, associate professor of economics at San Francisco State University. "We also found that the economic risks and responses to a changing coastline will vary greatly over time and from beach to beach."

The findings suggest that the cost and type of damage will vary depending on a community's economy, geography and local decisions about land use. For example, if sea level rises by 4.6 feet, Malibu beaches could lose almost $500 million in accumulated tourism revenue between now and 2100. Revenue losses would be much smaller at San Francisco's windswept Ocean Beach ($82 million), which attracts fewer visitors per year.

In addition to mean sea level rise, the study estimated the economic impact of more extreme flooding. Coastlines are already at risk of low-probability coastal storms -- like 100-year floods -- but higher sea levels are expected to extend the depth and reach of these floods, increasing the damage to homes, businesses and public infrastructure.

"In California, our coastline is one of our most valuable natural resources," King said. "More than 80 percent of Californians live in coastal communities, and California's beaches support local economies and critical natural species."

King and co-authors Aaron McGregor and Justin Whittet hope the findings will inform local planning efforts to evaluate and respond to sea level rise. "Understanding the kind of impact sea level rise will have is important for deciding what adaptive action to take," King said. "Seawalls have become the de facto policy for dealing with erosion and sea level rise but our findings suggest that other policies such as beach nourishment or where possible, allowing the coastline to retreat, could be more cost effective."

King and colleagues conducted their analysis primarily using secondary data, an approach which allowed them to calculate the economic impact of sea level rise at a fraction of the cost and time taken to complete the more commonly used shoreline hazard assessments.

Summary Of Key Findings

> Ocean Beach (north of Sloat Boulevard), San Francisco County

Based on a sea level rise estimate of 4.6 feet (1.4 meters) by 2100, Ocean Beach could lose:

· $19.6 million in damages caused by a 100-year coastal flood damaging homes and contents. This is an increase of 200 percent from the present day risk of a 100-year flood, which is $6.5 million

· $82 million in tourism spending and local and state tax revenue losses (accumulated between now and 2100) caused by a narrower, eroded beach attracting fewer visitors

· $16.5 million in habitat and recreation losses, caused by erosion reducing the beach area by 92 percent (53 acres lost). Ocean Beach provides a habitat for native species such as the Western Snowy Plover, a bird that is federally listed as a threatened species

· $540 million caused by land, buildings and infrastructure being lost or damaged by erosion and subsidence

Venice Beach, Los Angeles County

Based on a sea level rise estimate of 4.6 feet (1.4 meters) by 2100, Venice Beach could lose:

· $51.6 million in damages caused by a 100-year coastal flood damaging homes, commercial buildings and contents

· $439.6 million in tourism spending and local and state tax revenue losses (accumulated between now and 2100) caused by a narrower, eroded beach attracting fewer visitors

· $38.6 million in habitat and recreation losses, caused by erosion reducing the beach area by 16 percent

Zuma Beach and Broad Beach, Malibu, Los Angeles County

Based on a sea level rise estimate of 4.6 feet (1.4 meters) by 2100, Zuma Beach and Broad Beach could lose:

· $28.5 million in damage caused by a 100-year coastal flood damaging homes, commercial buildings and contents

· $498.7 million in tourism spending and local and state tax revenue losses (accumulated between now and 2100) caused by narrower, eroded beaches attracting fewer visitors

· $102.3 million in habitat and recreation losses caused by erosion reducing the beach area

Carpinteria City and State Beach, Santa Barbara County

Based on a sea level rise estimate of 4.6 feet (1.4 meters) by 2100, Carpinteria City and State Beach could lose:

· $10.7 million in damages caused by a 100-year coastal flood, damaging homes and contents, and commercial structures

· $164.7 million in tourism spending and local and state tax revenue losses (accumulated between now and 2100) caused by a narrower, eroded beach attracting fewer visitors

· $31.3 million in habitat and recreation losses caused by erosion reducing the beach area

· $300,000 caused by upland areas being lost or damaged by erosion and subsidence

Torrey Pines City and State Beach, San Diego County

Based on a sea level rise estimate of 4.6 feet (1.4 meters) by 2100, Torrey Pines City and State Beach could lose:

· $5 million in damages caused by a 100-year coastal flood, including damage to homes and contents, cars and roads

· $99 million in tourism spending and local and state tax revenue losses (accumulated between now and 2100) caused by a narrower, eroded beach attracting fewer visitors

· $20.2 million in habitat and recreation losses caused by erosion reducing the beach area by 100 percent

· $348.7 million caused by land, road and railway lines being lost or damaged by erosion and subsidence, including damage to the Los Angeles-San Diego-San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN) Rail Corridor

The Economic Costs of Sea-Level Rise to California Beach Communities was authored by Philip King, associate professor of economics at San Francisco State University, and research staff Aaron McGregor and Justin Whittet.

The study was commissioned and funded by the California Department of Boating and Waterways and peer-reviewed by the California Ocean Science Trust on behalf of the Ocean Protection Council.

Philip King can be reached at (530) 867-3935 (cell) or pgking@sfsu.edu.

Copies of the study and high-resolution images are available from Elaine Bible in University Communications at San Francisco State University: (415) 405-3606 or ebible@sfsu.edu.




May 27, 2010

Taskforce urges boaters’ vigilance over Memorial Day Weekend against invasive quagga and zebra mussels

SACRAMENTO--A California interagency taskforce battling the spread of invasive Quagga and Zebra mussels urges boaters to remain especially vigilant this Memorial Day weekend. Anyone who launches their vessel at any body of water must clean, drain, and dry their boats, personal watercraft, and any equipment that comes in contact with the water-both before arrival and after leaving the waterway.

“Quagga and zebra mussels are a serious threat to our aquatic environment and fisheries,” Director of the Department of Fish and Game (DFG) John McCamman said. “It’s crucial that everyone who uses public waters takes the time to make sure they’re not moving these mussels from place to place. It only takes a few mussels to infest an entire waterway and destroy the ecosystem there.”

Quagga and zebra mussels are non-native, fast-reproducing invasive species that will cause serious problems for boaters and water enthusiasts. Mussels spread from one body of water to another by attaching themselves to nearly anything that’s in the water for more than a few minutes. Water in boat engines, bilges, live-wells and buckets can carry tiny mussel larvae (called veligers) to other waterways, as well.

“Boat trailers are often overlooked as an avenue for the spread of quagga and zebra mussels and many other aquatic invasive species,” Department of Boating and Waterways Acting Director Lucia Becerra said. “About 85 percent of boaters trailer their boats, so it is critical for them to clean, drain, and dry their vessels.”

To help prevent the spread of mussels, boaters must inspect all exposed surfaces, wash boat hulls thoroughly, remove all plants from the boat and trailer, drain all water, including that in lower outboard units, clean, and dry live-wells and bait buckets, and dispose of baitfish in the trash. Watercraft should be kept dry for at least five days in warm weather and up to 30 days in cool weather between launches in different bodies of fresh water. These measures are essential to safeguard boats and preserve California waterways.

An excellent guide to cleaning vessels of invasive mussels is available on the website: www.dbw.ca.gov/PDF/BoatingQuaggaGuide.pdf.

Travelers are also advised to contact their destination waterway before leaving home, to learn what restrictions or inspection requirements are in place. Boaters entering the state should be prepared for inspections at California Department of Food and Agriculture Border Protection Stations. Inspections, which can also be conducted by DFG and the Department of Parks and Recreation, include not only a check of boats and personal watercraft, but also trailers and all onboard items.

Contaminated vessels and equipment are subject to quarantine or impoundment.

Quagga mussels were first detected in the Colorado River system in January 2007 and were later found in San Diego and Riverside counties.

They are now known to be in 21 waters in the Golden State, all in Southern California. Zebra mussels were discovered in San Justo Reservoir in San Benito County in January 2008.

Both mollusks can attach to and damage almost any submerged surface. They can:
· ruin a boat engine by blocking the cooling system and causing it to overheat;

· increase drag on the bottom of a boat, reducing speed and wasting fuel;

· jam a boat’s steering equipment, putting occupants and others at risk;

· require frequent scraping and repainting of boat hulls;

· colonize all underwater substrates such as boat ramps, docks, lines and other underwater surfaces, causing them to require constant cleaning;

· cost the owners of these items a great deal of money.

A toll-free hotline at 1-866-440-9530 is available for anyone involved in activities on lakes and rivers seeking information on quagga or zebra mussels.

A multi-agency taskforce that includes the California Department of Fish and Game, Department of Boating and Waterways, Department of Water Resources, and State Parks has been leading an outreach campaign to alert boaters and the public to the quagga and zebra mussel threats.

For more information about quagga and zebra mussels, the state’s response activities, and what you can do to help prevent their spread in California, visit the DFG Web site at www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/quaggamussel.




March 3, 2010

$2.386 Million Boat Launch and Facility Funding Approved

SACRAMENTO--The California Boating and Waterways Commission (Commission) today approved $2.386 million in boating facility improvement grants and loans. The grant and loan recipients are:

Coyote Point Marina, San Mateo -- San Mateo County

The Commission approved a $1,966,000 loan to San Mateo County for improvements to Dock 29 of the Coyote Point Marina. The project will include removal of the existing structures and installing new piles, docks, utilities, gangway and a security gate.

El Dorado Beach Boat Launching Facility, South Lake Tahoe – El Dorado County

The Commission approved a final $420,000 grant to the City of South Lake Tahoe for improvements to the El Dorado Beach Boat Launching Facility (BLF). The project will include replacing the existing bathroom, installing safety lighting and providing associated pedestrian paths from the existing parking lot to the proposed restroom.

Also in today’s meeting, newly appointed commissioners were welcomed for the first time. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed Brendan Huffman, San Joaquin Sheriff Steve Moore and Matthew Webb to the Boating and Waterways Commission, and reappointed H.P. Sandy Purdon. Other commission members include Douglas W. Metz and Lenora S. Clark.

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the California Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the seven-member Boating and Waterways Commission.




November 16, 2009

DBW Warns Boaters of Cold Water Immersion

SACRAMENTO - Winter boating season is upon us and the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) is reminding boaters about the risk of cold water immersion. The ocean and lake temperatures are their coldest this time of year and even a strong swimmer can experience difficulty if they accidentally find themselves in cold water.

“When boaters fall into cold water, it can take just a few minutes before their ability to swim and rescue themselves becomes compromised. The real risks can take effect in the first few seconds,” said DBW Director Raynor Tsuneyoshi. “The use of a life jacket increases their survival.”

DBW’s boating statistics for 2008 demonstrate that the likelihood of fatalities as the result of a boating accident is three times greater in the winter than in summer months.

The effects of cold water immersion are predictable and well documented by Dr. Gordon Giesbrecht, a thermophysiologist with the University of Manitoba and a world expert on freezing to death through his 1-10-1 principle.

1 minute: Upon accidental immersion the body reacts with an involuntary GASP followed by hyperventilation of up to 10 times regular breathing. If your head is underwater during that initial deep gasp you can inhale enough water to drown. Do not panic. Breathing will return to close to normal.

10 minutes: In cold water a person will become INCAPACITATED to the point that the muscles in their limbs stop working and they will no longer be able to swim or rescue themselves. Try to rescue yourself before incapacitation becomes a factor and if you cannot, at least try to get as much of your body out of the water as possible to delay the onset of hypothermia.

1 hour: After an hour, depending on the water temperature, the body continues to cool and the resulting HYPOTHERMIA can create a range of symptoms from confusion to unconsciousness and eventually leading to death.

The best way to survive an accidental cold water immersion is to wear your life jacket. It will help keep your head above water in the event of an accidental immersion until you can get your breathing under control. It will also keep you afloat while you concentrate on rescuing yourself. If you are unable to rescue yourself, your life jacket can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you afloat until someone else can rescue you.

Boaters are also advised to file a float plan before heading out on the water. The chances of successfully locating an overdue boat are much greater if the US Coast Guard or other rescue agencies have certain facts about the boat trip that may be included on a float plan. For your own safety and before boating, file a float plan with a reliable person who will notify authorities if necessary.

For more information on safe boating or to fill out a float plan, please visit www.BoatSmarter.com or call (888) 326-2822.




November 5, 2009

Carbon Monoxide Boating Safety Stressed During Awareness Week

SACRAMENTO – The Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) and the U.S. Coast Guard remind boaters to review safety procedures during Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week Nov. 9-15.

“Carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless and surprisingly a danger in open-air environments, such as boats,” said DBW Director Raynor Tsuneyoshi. “Regular maintenance, proper boat operation and safety awareness can reduce the risk of injury from this gas.”

Many boaters are aware that carbon monoxide is a danger in enclosed spaces when using on-board generators, heaters and stoves. But the gas can also accumulate in areas around and under a motorboat’s swim platform.

According to the World Health Organization, exposure to the gas at a level exceeding 87 parts per million (ppm) over a 15-minute interval is considered dangerous. Testing on late model ski boats has measured carbon monoxide levels ranging from 90-1,000 ppm. Boaters should avoid boat engine exhaust vent areas and not swim in these areas when the engine or generator is operating.

Additional ways to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide exposure in the boating environment:
* If your boat has rear-vented generator exhaust, check with the boat manufacturer for possible recall or reroute the exhaust to a safe area.

* Schedule regular engine and exhaust system maintenance inspections by experienced and trained technicians. Keep forward-facing hatches open, even in inclement weather, to allow fresh air circulation in living spaces. When possible, run the boat so that prevailing winds will help dissipate the exhaust.

* Install a carbon monoxide detector in each accommodation space on your boat. Check detectors before each trip to be sure they are functioning properly.

* Boaters are also reminded that “teak surfing” is dangerous and a violation of California law. This activity involves clinging to the swim platform or transom of an underway boat, then letting go and body surfing. Exposure to carbon monoxide from the boat’s engine can cause a teak surfer to faint and, if not wearing a life jacket, to drown.

* The law prohibiting teak surfing went into effect Jan. 1, 2005 under the Anthony Farr and Stacey Beckett Boating Safety Act of 2004, which also requires that a set of carbon monoxide warning stickers be placed on the transom and helm of all new and used motorized boats sold in California. Decals are available through DBW.

* Carbon monoxide is colorless, odorless, tasteless and mixes evenly with the air. It enters your bloodstream through the lungs and displaces the oxygen your body needs. Prolonged exposure to low concentrations or very short exposure to high concentrations can lead to death. In boating environments carbon monoxide poisoning is confused with seasickness, intoxication or heat stress. If someone on board complains of irritated eyes, headache, nausea, weakness or dizziness, immediately move the person to fresh air, investigate the cause and take corrective action. Seek medical attention, if necessary.

For a pamphlet about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning or to obtain a warning decal for boats, visit http://www.dbw.ca.gov/BoaterInfo/CODanger.aspx.




October 6, 2009

$631,000 Boat Launch and Facility Improvement Grant Approved

SACRAMENTO--The California Boating and Waterways Commission today approved a $631,000 grant for improvements to the County of Shasta for the Balls Ferry Boat Launching Facility.

The project includes demolition of the existing deteriorated ramp, construction of a new single-lane boat launch ramp with vertical curve and a pre-cast vault restroom, installation of a new boarding float, resurfacing of the existing parking area, new sidewalks and lightning, a concrete project credit sign, and low-maintenance landscaping and ancillary items.

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the California Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the seven-member Boating and Waterways Commission.




Fastlane_Sailing.jpg: Click Here

September 21, 2009

DBW Releases Non-Motorized Boating Report - Fastest Growing Segment of the Recreational Boating Community

SACRAMENTO – Non-motorized boating has skyrocketed in California and is now the fastest growing segment of recreational boating in the state according to a report released today. Non-Motorized Boating in California, initiated by the Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) to help address the lack of information about the demographic, shows that non-motorized boating contributed $1.7 billion to California’s economy in 2006.

“This report tells us that the popularity of non-motorized boating is on the upswing and that we can expect thousands of new boaters to enjoy the waterways in the coming years,” said DBW Director Raynor Tsuneyoshi. ”Kayaking, canoeing and rafting are great ways to enjoy California’s beautiful waterways, and this report will serve as an important planning tool for meeting boaters’ needs.”

The report, the first in depth study of non-motorized boating in the United States, provides information on all aspects of non-motorized boating, including the numbers and types of boats and participants, and the economic importance to the state. The report was conducted over a twelve month period during 2006 and 2007. Key findings include:
An estimated 2.5 million Californians participate in non-motorized boating, generating more than 48 million non-motorized boater user days.

About 1.7 million rafts, canoes and inflatable boats are now being enjoyed on California’s waterways; this number is expected to continue to grow rapidly.

Kayaks are the most common type of boat, followed by inflatable boats.

Research included in the report suggests that non-motorized activity has grown in recent years because it is relatively inexpensive. Growth can also be attributed to continued new participation among baby boomers as they near and enter retirement.

Prior studies have reviewed particular aspects of non-motorized boating, such as national boating participation rates or boating safety, but never a broad assessment at the national level or in any other state.

The Non-Motorized Boating in California report provides a new and better understanding of the social and economic benefits of non-motorized boating, and contains important information that organizations can utilize to mold policy and fiscal issues and improve boater safety and education, waterways management and public access. DBW’s full report is available at http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Reports/N-M_Boating.aspx.




September 22, 2009

Boaters Asked to Help Halt Spread of Asian Kelp

SACRAMENTO – Federal, state and local agencies are urging boaters, marina and yacht club operators, and the general public to help halt the spread of Asian Kelp. This aquatic invasive species, also known as Undaria pinnatifida, has been found in San Francisco Bay and Pillar Point Harbor (Half Moon Bay).

“As far as we can determine at this point, the infestations are small, but the populations include many large, reproductive adults, which appear to have already spawned,” said Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) scientist Chela Zabin. “If we take swift action, we may be able to prevent this from spreading further and avoid economic and ecological damages.”

Asian Kelp can grow on ship hulls, nets, fishing gear, moorings, ropes, docks and other marine structures. Although it can spread short distances on its own, invasions have been linked to boating traffic.

All boaters and anyone who accesses the San Francisco and Half Moon bays are being asked to take the following steps to halt the spread of the Asian Kelp:
Report any observations of this kelp to SERC.
Identify the exact location.
If possible, remove the kelp and send photographs to SERC to confirm identity.
Store the sample in a plastic bag in a cooler or refrigerator until its identity has been confirmed.
Avoid moving contaminated (infected) vessels or equipment.

Clean boats before moving or returning home. Specifically:
Clean boat hull, underwater running gear, and internal seawater systems before traveling beyond home region, especially if visiting major ports, international waters, islands or event with boats from many places.

Clean the boat again before moving to another region or returning home.
If boat is heavily fouled after such trips, haul it for cleaning upon arrival and contain the fouling growth.
Drain livewells, bait tanks and bilge water before traveling and before returning.
Do not throw the kelp back in the water.

Because of its prolific growth and large size, the Asian Kelp can quickly foul natural and man-made structures, causing economic and ecological damage. It also competes for light and space with native populations of marine algae, plants and animals, drastically affecting native ecosystems.

The California Department of Boating and Waterways, and scientists from the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, the California State Lands Commission and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are working with SERC to carefully delineate the boundaries of the current populations while engaged in a manual removal effort and educate the public on this aquatic invasive plant.

This invader has been in Southern California since the year 2000. It has spread into the harbors of Channel Island, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Monterey, Oceanside, Pt. Hueneme, Santa Barbara and Santa Catalina, and into the bays of Mission and San Diego.

Additional information about how to prevent the spread of the Asian Kelp and other saltwater aquatic invasive species, or how to order educational material, or to volunteer for removal and survey efforts may be found on www.dbw.ca.gov or by contacting (415) 435-712, sercundaria@si.edu.




September 3, 2009

Last Opportunity to Receive an Inflatable Life Jacket this Summer

SACRAMENTO – The 2009 Wear It California! life jacket campaign will conclude at a Sept. 5 event at Tower Park Marina in Lodi. The campaign has distributed close to 700 inflatable life jackets to boaters on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta this summer.

At the event, which will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., life jackets will be distributed along with boating safety materials. To be eligible to receive a life jacket, boaters must be over the age of 16 and present a signed pledge card to the Wear It California! crew at the event. The pledge card, which states that boaters promise to wear a life jacket while boating, can be downloaded from the campaign’s Web site, www.WearItCalifornia.com, or can be filled out the event. Life jacket supplies are limited.

Boaters are also invited to enter the campaign’s summer sweepstakes contest to win a $1,000 shopping spree courtesy of Bass Pro Shops. There are two ways boaters can win: visit www.WearItCalifornia.com and complete the online survey or meet up with the Wear It California! during the event and complete a pledge card. By providing contact information, names will be entered for the final drawing taking place in late September 2009.

The Wear It California! campaign, promoted by the U.S. Coast Guard and the California Department of Boating and Waterways, is part of a national effort designed to increase life jacket wear rates among recreational boaters and sport enthusiasts. For the past two years, the California campaign has been successful in promoting life jacket use in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Wear rates rose from six percent in 2006 to 13 percent in 2007, while remaining largely flat in other areas of the country. This measured success has motivated other states to adopt the program in their communities.

For more information about the Wear It California! campaign, please visit www.WearItCalifornia.com or call (916) 591-0521.




September 2, 2009

Boaters Urged to Operate Safely Over Labor Day Weekend

SACRAMENTO - The Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) reminds boaters to operate safely and wear their life jackets this upcoming Labor Day weekend. The three holiday periods of Memorial Day, Independence Day and Labor Day in 2008 accounted for six fatalities in California. Five of them occurred during the September holiday.

“When waterways get crowded, the chances for collision increase,” said DBW Director Raynor Tsuneyoshi. “It is important that boaters maintain a proper lookout, abstain from alcohol and wear a life jacket.”

> Some key boating safety tips to keep in mind this holiday weekend

Pay attention to your surroundings. Operator inattention was the leading cause of boating accidents last year. While the operator is ultimately responsible for maintaining a proper lookout, it is a good idea to designate someone else on board to help watch for other traffic, especially on a large boat or in congested areas.

Mixing alcohol and boating is dangerous. Of all reported fatalities, 49 percent were alcohol related in 2008. A designated driver is not enough on vessels. The concept works well in cars, but drunken passengers on boats can easily fall overboard, swim near the propeller or cause loading problems by leaning over the side or standing up in small vessels, causing vessels to capsize. Everyone who drinks alcohol on board is at risk.

Wear a life jacket. Of the 32 drowning victims in 2008, more than half knew how to swim. Knowing how to swim is one of the most common reasons given for not wearing a life jacket and gives boaters a false sense of security. Often the victim has a serious injury or is knocked unconscious and cannot swim. Other factors that can affect swimming ability include cold water immersion, heavy clothes or alcohol consumption.




August 31, 2009

San Francisco Bay Area Seminar to Educate Boaters About Aquatic Invasive Species

SACRAMENTO— Boaters are invited to learn about their role in combating aquatic invasive species at a seminar September 24 in Sausalito. The seminar will be held from 8:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Bay Model Visitor Center - 2100 Bridgeway. It is free and open to the public. Registration is required by September 21.

Aquatic invasive species like Quagga and Zebra mussels pose a serious threat to water delivery systems, hydroelectric facilities, agriculture, recreational boating and fishing and the ecosystem. The seminar will explain why it is important for boaters to learn how to inspect their watercraft and fishing gear to prevent the spread of these species into California waterways. Boats are the most common avenues for spreading Quagga mussels and other aquatic invasive species.

The seminar will be hosted by the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) and the California Coastal Commission’s Boating Clean and Green Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (UFWS), the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE)—Sea Grant Extension Program, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) and the Marin County Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program.

Presenters include, DFG Environmental Scientist Catherine Mandella, USFWS Invasive Species Watershed Coordinator Ron Smith, UCCE Sea Grant Extension Program Marine Advisors Dr. Carolynn (Carrie) Culver and Leigh Taylor Johnson, SERC Ecologist Chela Zabin and Boating Clean and Green Coordinator, Vivian Matuk.

For questions about the seminar or to register, please contact Vivian Matuk at vmatuk@coastal.ca.gov or (415) 904-6905.




Arizona Boating & Watersports/Western Outdoor Times
E-Mail Arizona Boating & Watersports/Western Outdoor Times

Recreation Is Mobile.®
Dinghy Digest: Click Here
DD ® reaches 40,000 readers weekly. Get Your Free Copy Subscribe Dinghy Digest Copyright ©2009 Western Outdoor Times/Arizona Boating & Watersports. All Rights Reserved


 

Latest Issue: Click Here

Subscribe To Arizona Boating & Watersports/
Western Outdoor Times

Online News and Western Outdoor Times Weekly

AZBW Advertising
AZBW/WOT Accepts PayPal: Click Here
Distribution Locations: Click Here

Just click on any of the businesses below to see their Web sites.

Bartlett Lake Marina: Click Here
Superstition Search & Rescue: Click Here
Eagle View RV: Click Here
Marine Services Mark Silvey: Click Here
Tailfeather Inn: Click Here
Seatow San Diego: Click Here
Shake Rattle & Troll Radio: Click Here
Tour Clare: Click Here
USCG Auxilliary: Click Here
ABC Marine: Click Here
All In One Fitness: Click Here
ASU Bass Team: Click Here
Arizona Game & Fish Department: Click Here
Bill Ryver Signs: Click Here
Hales Marine Service: Click Here
Nitro Chicken: Click Here
Sun Valley Fiber-Glas: Click Here
Copyright ©2005 - ©2011 Western Outdoor Times/Arizona Boating & Watersports. All Rights Reserved