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Arizona State Parks Board Authorizes Eight Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Fund Projects

(Phoenix, Arizona - April 2, 2013) - The Arizona State Parks Board authorized eight Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Recreation Fund projects totaling $778,563 at the March 20, 2013 Parks Board meeting. The statewide OHV Program uses funds from the state Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Fund and the federal Recreational Trails Program (motorized portion) to fund projects that meet the high priority needs identified in the 2010 State Trails Plan.

The Arizona State Parks Board's volunteer advisory committees (Off-Highway Vehicle Advisory Group (OHVAG) and the Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission (AORCC) review project applications periodically and make funding recommendations to the Arizona Parks Board. In addition to trail and facility improvements, the funds can be used for mitigation of damage caused by OHV activities, cultural and environmental compliances, and education projects/programs and law enforcement.

The eight projects approved for funding include:
- $61,410 to the Bureau of Land Management (Kingman Field Office) to complete route evaluations, install kiosks, and renovate trail within their management area;

- $289,826 to the Coconino National Forest (Flagstaff Ranger District) will develop a trail system and support facilities south of the Flagstaff airport;

- $12,585 to the Coconino Trail Riders (a non-profit OHV user organization) for tools and personal protective equipment to be used to assist the Coconino National Forest in construction their trail system;

- $97,000 to the Bureau of Land Management (Tucson Field Office) for improvements within the Middle Gila OHV area;

- $128,842 to the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests (Lakeside Ranger District) to continue trail renovation work on the Maverick OHV Trail;

- $113,800 to the Bureau of Land Management (Yuma Field Office) to complete route evaluation, install signs, and provide maps for the La Posa Management Unit;

- $72,100 to the Bureau of Land Management (Lake Havasu Field Office) to complete route evaluations and provide route signage and maps within their management area;

- $3,000 to the Arizona Game and Fish Department to install route signs within the Alamo Lake Wildlife area.

The Arizona State Parks OHV Recreation Fund (revenue from gas taxes attributed to OHV use) has been in existence since 1991 and has funded more than 100 projects totaling over $10 million to provide OHV trails, support facilities, trail signage, and OHV maps; mitigate resource damage; and support OHV education and law enforcement. In 2008 the Arizona Legislature authorized a new Off-Highway Vehicle "Sticker Fund" which started producing revenues in January of 2009. A $25 fee is charged for off-highway vehicles each year and that sticker is then attached to the license plates of these vehicles. Revenue from sticker sales has added over $2 million per year to the OHV Recreation Fund. The fund is shared with the AZ Game and Fish Department (35%) and State Land Department (5%). Projects are solicited two to three times annually and information about that schedule and the application process is available at the State Parks website at http://AZStateParks.com/grants.

State Parks develops the OHV recreation plan every five years with input from land managing agency staff, OHV user organizations, individual OHV users, and the general public. The 2010 State Trails Plan can be viewed at: http://AZStateParks.com/publications.

For information about all 27 Arizona State Parks, the Trails and Off-Highway Vehicle Programs and State Historic Preservation Office call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703), visit the website and online camping reservations at AZStateParks.com, Twitter/Facebook AZStateParks.



30th Annual Archaeology Expo At Horseshoe Ranch On March 16

(Phoenix, AZ - February 11, 2013) - The Archaeology Expo (Expo) is the featured event for the Archaeology & Heritage Awareness Month (AAHAM). This year's Expo will be held on Saturday, March 16, 2013 from 9 am to 4 pm at the Historic Horseshoe Ranch on the Agua Fria National Monument and is sponsored by the SHPO / ASP and co-hosted by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Arizona Game and Fish Department.

The event is free and open to the public. There will be many hands on family activities suitable for the young or the young at heart. Activities include rabbit stick toss, Atlatl (spear) throwing and roping plastic calves. Numerous booths also provide other hands on activities as well as the results of archaeological research. Lecture opportunities and tours to several historic and prehistoric sites are available throughout the day.

The Historic Horseshoe Ranch is located at 2260 E. Bloody Basin Road in Mayer, AZ. Take I-17 to Bloody Basin Road and then follow the signs. Please note: The road to Horseshoe Ranch is graded gravel road. Some of the tours to prehistoric sites require a high clearance vehicle with 4 x 4 capabilities. The lands around Horseshoe are open camping areas, but recommended for tent camping due to the access road. For more information about road conditions call the BLM Phoenix Field Office at (623) 580-5500.

In addition to the Archaeology Expo, the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO)/Arizona State Parks (ASP) is coordinating activities throughout the state for the 30th annual celebration of Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month (AAHAM).

These events held the entire month of March 2013 focus on current efforts to preserve our past by protecting our fragile and non-renewable cultural resources. AAHAM combines education with entertainment to reach both adults and children in an effort to teach responsible stewardship of our cultural resources. Museums, historical societies, tribes, agencies, parks, and archaeology organizations will be hosting events across the state.

Proclaimed by the Governor each year, this celebration will feature prehistoric and historic site tours, exhibits, hikes, open houses, lectures, demonstrations and other activities throughout Arizona. A free statewide listing of these events and activities is now available by contacting the ASP offices at (602) 542-4174, by visiting the ASP website at www.azstateparks.com or see the schedule below. For more information about Archaeology Expo or AAHAM Month, visit AZStateParks.com or call (602) 542-4174.

CENTRAL ARIZONA CAVE CREEK

MARCH 2: (9 am - 3 pm)
Cave Creek Archaeology Fair at Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area (SCRCA). Sponsored by Desert Foothills Chapter/Arizona Archaeological Society, Cave Creek Museum, and the SCRCA. Hikes to sites, booths, crafts, lectures, pottery and flint-knapping demonstrations, plus other hands-on, children activities will be featured. Guided hikes of the SCRCA trails are scheduled through out the day. Hikes require water, sunscreen, and appropriate hiking shoes. Cave Creek Museum, 44000 N. Spur Cross Rd.; take Spur Cross Rd. from Cave Creek Rd. north 4-1/2 miles. Free. CONTACT: MARY KEARNEY, (623) 687-0721 or maryk92@aol.com.

MARCH 9: (11 am - 2 pm)
Talk and Demonstration: "Weaving Native American Rugs." Sponsored by the Cave Creek Museum. Cave Creek Museum, 6140 Skyline Dr. Take Cave Creek Rd. north, past Carefree Highway, and continue north to Skyline Dr.; turn right on Skyline and follow the curve to the left. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: EVELYN JOHNSON, (480) 488-2764 or info@cavecreekmuseum.com.

MARCH 23: (1:30 pm)
Children's Archaeology Education Program. Sponsored by the Cave Creek Museum. Children will learn to listen to what artifacts are telling us. They will reconstruct a reproduction of a ceramic pot and take part in a mock archaeology dig. Appropriate for children ages 7 - 12. Cave Creek Museum, 6140 Skyline Dr.; take Cave Creek Rd. north, pass Carefree Highway, and continue north to Skyline Dr.; turn right on Skyline and follow the curve to the left. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: EVELYN JOHNSON, (480) 488-2764 or info@cavecreekmuseum.com.

CHANDLER

TUESDAYS THROUGH SATURDAYS IN MARCH: (10 am - 4 pm)
Exhibit: "Choosing a Future with Water: Lessons from the Hohokam." Sponsored by City of Chandler and the Chandler Museum. McCullough-Price Home Museum, 300 S. Chandler Village Dr., Chandler (west of Chandler Fashion Mall). This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: TIFFANI RIGHERO, (480) 782-2874 or tiffany.righero@chandleraz.gov.

MARCH 9: (11 am - 5 pm)
Historic Building Tours: McCroskey House and Morrison Store. McCroskey House, Tumbleweed Park, 2250 S. McQueen Rd., Chandler - (Enter Ranch from Pioneer Pkwy). This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Included with entrance fee during the Ostrich Festival. CONTACT: TIFFANI RIGHERO, (480) 782-2874 or tiffany.righero@chandleraz.gov.

COOLIDGE SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS IN MARCH: (9 am)
Site Tours: Backcountry Sites at Casa Grande Ruins National Monument. Sponsored by National Park Service. Some areas that are normally closed to the public will be available during these tours. Organized groups may not reserve an entire tour. Plan to arrive at the Park Visitor Center by 8:45 am, wear sturdy shoes and bring water. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, 1100 W. Ruins Dr. Regular entrance fees apply. This event is suitable for children. Reservations are required, as the tours are limited to 10 people. CONTACT: Information Desk, (520) 723-3172 ext. 12. Reservations may not be made via email, for details see www.nps.gov/cagr.

CORDES JUNCTION

MARCH 9: (9 am)
Hikes: "Walled Village" and "Life on the Edge", archaeological sites, Perry Mesa Culture. Sponsored by BLM and Friends of the Agua Fria National Monument. Meet at the Kiosk located at Bloody Basin Road exit off of I-17. From there drive to parking area, and commence hike to both sites. It's an easy to medium hike to the sites through high desert brush. Both sites contain petroglyphs and one has a large room block. Reservations are required, as the tour is limited to 15 people. Bring water, lunch, hiking shoes, and sunscreen - weather-permitting. High clearance vehicle recommended. This event is suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: STEVEN BROWN, (623) 249-4460 or steven@aguafria.org or www.aguafriafriends.org.

GLOBE

MARCH 16 & 17: (8 am - 5 pm)
Heritage Days: Upper and Lower Cliff Dwellings at Tonto National Monument. Sponsored by National Park Service. Prehistoric technology demonstrations will occur daily. No tour reservations needed. Bring water and hiking shoes. Tonto National Monument is located 30 miles northwest of Globe on Highway 188. This event is suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: SUSAN HUGHES, (928) 467-2241 ext. 8400 or susan_hughes@nps.gov.

MARCH 23 & 24: (9 am - 5 pm)
Open House: Besh Ba Gowah Archaeological Park. Sponsored by Besh Ba Gowah Archaeological Park and the City of Globe. Activities will include reproduction rock art rubbings and corn grinding. Site tours at 10 am and 2 pm. Besh Ba Gowah Archaeological Park, 1324 Jesse Hayes Rd. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Saturday free, Sunday regular fees apply. CONTACT: ROSE MANSOUR, (928) 425-0320 or beshbagowah@globeaz.gov.

MESA

THURSDAYS THROUGH SUNDAYS IN MARCH: (Thursday - Saturday 10 am - 3 pm & Sunday 1 - 4 pm) Tours of Mesa Grande Mound and Museum. Sponsored by Arizona Museum of Natural History. Mesa Grande is one of two great platform mounds found in the Salt River Valley. It will open to the public early 2013 and tours will be given during March. Mesa Grande, 10th & Date St., block west of Country Club Dr. on Brown Rd (turns into Date St.). This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Regular fees apply. CONTACT: JERRY HOWARD, (480) 644-3428 or jerry.howard@mesaaz.gov or www.azmnh.org.

PHOENIX

SATURDAYS IN MARCH: (9 am - 4 pm)
Dig! The Capitol. Sponsored by the Arizona Capitol Museum. Activities include: "Underwater Archaeology of the USS Arizona" - Use underwater archaeology techniques without getting wet, located on the 1st Floor; "Who Worked Here?" - Examine turn of the century documents and devices to discover who worked at the Capitol, located on the 2nd Floor; "Piecing Together Arizona" - Excavate in an artificial pit to find artifacts of earlier cultures that tell us about Arizona's past; located on the 3rd Floor. Arizona Capitol Museum, 1700 W. Washington Street. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: LUKE BATE, (602) 803-2697 or lbate@azlibrary.gov.

MARCH 2: (9:30 am - 12:30 pm)
Archaeology for Kids: PGM. Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeology Park. Become a Junior Archaeologist and discover the science of archaeology by doing a simulated excavation of a Hohokam pithouse. Learn about mapping, recording, and other archaeological methods and concepts. Appropriate for ages 7-12. Bring comfortable shoes, hat, and sunscreen. Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 East Washington St. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Pre-registration of $15 per child is required. CONTACT: LAURA ANDREW, (602) 495-0901 or laura.andrew@phoenix.gov or www.PuebloGrande.com.

MARCH 2: (1 - 2 pm)
Lecture: "The Archaeology of Mesa Grande," by Drs. Jerry Howard and Tom Wilson. Sponsored by Deer Valley Rock Art Center. Join us for this lecture about a large Hohokam prehistoric mound located in the City of Mesa. Deer Valley Rock Art Center, 3711 W. Deer Valley Rd. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: CASANDRA HERNANDEZ, (623) 582-8007 or casandra.hernandez@asu.edu.

MARCH 6: (7:30 - 9 pm)
Free Lecture: "Dobson Sheep Trail," by Cindy Shank. Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park Auxiliary. Experience a piece of Arizona history. Learn about a real sheep drive through the eyes of author Cindy Shanks. Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 East Washington St., Phoenix. This event is wheelchair accessible. Free. CONTACT: LAURA ANDREW, (602) 495-0901 or laura.andrew@phoenix.gov or www.PuebloGrande.com.

MARCH 9: (10 am - 3 pm)
Ancient Technology Day: Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park. Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum. Join us for a fun day! Learn how people made jewelry, ceramics, and tools, and obtained food long before hardware and grocery stores existed. Fun activities: try your hand at tossing an atlatl (spear), flintknapping, or rock art. Also try our frybread and agave roast, cooked the traditional way. Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 East Washington St., Phoenix. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: Laura Andrew, (602) 495-0901 or laura.andrew@phoenix.gov or www.PuebloGrande.com.

MARCH 13 & 27: (2 - 2:30 pm)
Behind the Scenes Tour with Curator: Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park. Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum. Join Curator of Collections Holly Young for a "behind the scenes" tour of the museum. This is an opportunity to learn about the artifacts that are not on display and what steps are taken to care for them. This event is appropriate for older children and wheelchair accessible. Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 East Washington St., Phoenix. Free with paid admission. CONTACT: LAURA ANDREW, (602) 495-0901 or laura.andrew@phoenix.gov or www.PuebloGrande.com.

MARCH 14: (10:30 am)
Historic Cemetery Walk: Pioneers' Cemetery. Sponsored by Pioneers' Cemetery Association. Pioneers Cemetery/Park is located along West Jefferson Avenue at South 14th Ave. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Regular fees apply. CONTACT: BOB COX, (623) 849-2504, (602) 534-1262 or pioneercem@yahoo.com or www.azhistcemeteries.org.

MARCH 14: (7 pm)
Lecture: "Site Chronology, Site Structure and Site Organization of the Palo Verde Ruin," by Mark Hackbarth. Sponsored by Arizona Archaeological Society, Phoenix Chapter, and Pueblo Grande Museum. Palo Verde Ruin is one of the largest Hohokam villages on the New River in the west valley of Phoenix. All topics will be discussed in terms of the collapse of the ball court system and the abandonment of the Northern Periphery around AD 1050 - AD 1150. Pueblo Grande Museum, Community Room, 4619 E. Washington St. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: ELLIE LARGE, (480) 461- 0563 or elarge@cox.net.

MARCH 23: (10 am - 4 pm)
Rock Art Expo. Join the Deer Valley Rock Art Center for its biggest event of the year! Participate in interactive stations on archaeology and desert ecology, hands-on crafts for kids, ancient spear throwing demonstrations, a mock archaeology dig, and agave tasting. Special guided tours of the petroglyph trail and musical performances will also be featured. Appropriate for vision and/or hearing impaired. Deer Valley Rock Art Center, 3711 W. Deer Valley Rd. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Free. CONTACT: CASANDRA HERNANDEZ, (623) 582-8007 or casandra.hernandez@asu.edu.

MARCH 29: (10 - 11 am)
Tour: Park of the Four Waters. Sponsored by Pueblo Grande Museum. The Hohokam people lived in the Salt River area from AD 450 to AD 1450. They were an agricultural society, growing corn beans and squash. To support their farming they built miles of canals to direct the river water to their crops. The Park of the Four Waters tour will take you on a walk through natural desert to the ruins of one of these large canals. Appropriate for children aged 13 and older. Space is limited, reservations required. Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 East Washington St. This event is suitable for children. Tours are free with paid admission. CONTACT: LAURA ANDREW, (602) 495-0901 or laura.andrew@phoenix.gov or www.pueblogrande.com.

TEMPE

MARCH 2: (9 am - Noon)
Walk or Bike through History! Sponsored by the City of Tempe and the Tempe Historic Preservation Foundation. Tour historic Tempe. Multiple tours available. Must have a working bicycle and helmet for bike tours. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Meet at the Hackett House Plaza, 95 W. 4th St. CONTACT: MARK VINSON, (480) 350-8367 or mark_vinson@tempe.gov.

WICKENBURG

MARCH 8: (Noon - 1 pm)
Lecture: "Navajo, Hopi and Zuni Jewelry and Fetishes," by Nancy Kiernan. Sponsored by Desert Caballeros Western Museum and the Arizona Humanities Council. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Desert Caballeros Western Museum, 21 N. Frontier Street, Wickenburg. Free. CONTACT: BECKY ROVEY or (928) 684-2272, ext. 100.

MARCH 19: (9 am - 3 pm)
Auto Tour: Desert Adventure to Historic Peeples Valley and Skull Valley. Sponsored by Desert Caballeros Western Museum. Visit a historic schoolhouse and museum in Skull Valley. Self-drive or carpool; lunch on your own or at Skull Valley Cafe. This event is suitable for children. Contact Sarah for meeting time and place. Reservations required. Cost is $35 members/$50 non-members (proceeds help underwrite the Museum's education programs). CONTACT: SARAH BROWNING, (928) 684-2272, ext. 100 or reservations@westernmuseum.org.

MARCH 24: (10 am - 3 pm)
8th Annual Invitational Exhibition and Sale: "Cowgirl Up! Art from the Other Half of the West." Sponsored by Desert Caballeros Western Museum. Celebrate the extraordinary talent of women artists from throughout the West. Meet participating artists during the weekend events. Weekend Breakfast and Quick Draw competition and auction. This event is wheelchair accessible and suitable for children. Desert Caballeros Western Museum, 21 N. Frontier St. For ticket information, www.westernmuseum.org or (928) 684-2272. CONTACT: BECKY ROVEY, (928) 684-2272, ext. 100 or info@westernmuseum.org.

MARCH 28: (Noon - 1 pm)
Lecture Series: "Ancient Landscapes of the Southwest," by Wayne Ranney. Sponsored by Desert Caballeros Western Museum and the Arizona Humanities Council. This event is wheelchair accessible. Desert Caballeros Western Museum, 21 N. Frontier St. Free. CONTACT: BECKY ROVEY, (928) 684-2272, ext. 100 or info@westernmuseum.org.

For information about all 27 Arizona State Parks, the Trails and Off-Highway Vehicle Programs and State Historic Preservation Office call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703), visit the website and online camping reservations at AZStateParks.com, Twitter/Facebook AZStateParks.



Red Rock State Park Features Apache History
Geology and Bird Walks in January

(Phoenix, AZ - December 21, 2012) - Red Rock State Park is the perfect place to experience the red rocks of Sedona, several hiking trails, bird-watching and daily special events that feature the opportunity to learn about local geology, archaeology, botany, history and wildlife. The diverse habitat, abundant with plants and wildlife, creates the perfect environment for the Park's mission of providing environmental education programs.

On Sunday, January 6, 2013 at 2 p.m., the Sunday Lecture Series, "Apache Warfare and the Scouts," will feature Apache Elder Vincent Randall and Chris Coder, archaeologist for the Yavapai-Apache Nation. Their presentation on Apache Warfare and the Scouts will be presented in the Red Rock State Park theatre. Make a reservation by calling (928) 282-6907 as seating is limited.

Join an experienced guide on a hike focusing on the geology of the area on Sunday, January 13 at 2 p.m. Learn why the rocks are red, where they came from, where they are going, and more. The hike includes the Eagle's Nest Trail for great views while also learning about the geology. It's more than a guided hike. It's an interpretive experience for beginners as well as advanced geologists. The hike lasts 2 to 2½ hours and has a 250 feet elevation climb. A knowledgeable guide will explain the rock formations that create the scenic backdrop of Red Rock State Park. Bring water and wear suitable shoes.

Wednesday and Saturday mornings at 9am in January, visitors will find bird enthusiasts joining a naturalist for a "Guided Bird Walk" directed at beginning and advanced birders. Bring your own binoculars; only a limited number are available for loan from the park. Visitors will see the many birds that make the park their home.

Daily at 10 a.m., visitors can join a naturalist on a guided nature walk that lasts 1½ to 2 hours and will introduce them to the riparian ecosystem of Oak Creek and other aspects of the park. Plants, wildlife, geology, history and archaeology are some of the subjects that may be discussed.

Daily at 2 p.m., the park hosts either a guest speaker or a ranger/naturalist led activity of approximately 45-minutes. Programs may include a nature-hike, a special presentation or an educational/nature video. This program may be an indoor or outdoor activity.

Visitors may also explore on their own. The family-oriented trail system is well marked for both safety and pleasure. Five miles of trails consist of interconnecting loops, leading to red rock vistas or along the lush greenery of Oak Creek. The three major loops are connected along the riparian corridor by the Kisva Trail, which also leads to the short loop of the Yavapai Ridge Trail. The Javelina Trail takes you into the pinon/juniper woodlands and back to the other loops. Detailed information is available at the Visitor Center. Bikes and horses are allowed on designated routes.

A Junior Ranger program is available for children between the ages of six and 12. Junior Rangers pledge their part in helping preserve the beauty of the park for everyone! Junior Ranger booklets, available at the Visitor Center, have activities to complete and, once approved by a Ranger, the newest Junior Ranger at Red Rock State Park is sworn in after taking the pledge and receiving a Junior Ranger button.

The Park Visitor Center features many displays about the area's geology, archaeology, flora and fauna, including an interactive relief map of Sedona and computer programs about various park features. The popular video, "The Natural Wonders of Sedona," is shown several times daily in the Park Theatre. Aerial explorations reveal ancient Indian ruins and dramatic landscapes, colorful desert wildflowers and local wildlife.

For more information about Red Rock State Park call (928) 282-6907. Red Rock State Park is located at 4050 Lower Red Rock Loop Road in Sedona, AZ. Park hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the Visitor Center is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Entrance fee is $10 per vehicle, up to four adults. The Arizona State Park Annual Fee is available for $75 (some restrictions apply).

For information about all 27 Arizona State Parks, the Trails and Off-Highway Vehicle Programs and State Historic Preservation Office call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703), visit the website and online camping reservations at AZStateParks.com, Twitter/Facebook AZStateParks.



State Parks Invites You To Get Involved

As most of you have read or heard, the Arizona State Parks department has struggled to survive during the budget crisis. What we want you to know is largely because of 14 partnerships with rural communities, we have been able to keep all 27 of State Parks open, although some of them only seasonally.

Because the State Parks are open, we can invite visitors to Arizona from around the world.

RV2_AZ_State_Park_DSCF2854.JPGDead Horse Ranch State Park Kayakers

Arizona is fortunate to have 900 dedicated volunteers who work every day to greet two million guests in these rural State Parks. We are also granting-out thousands of dollars for statewide hiking trails and off-highway vehicle management from state and federal funds.

On Arizona's state and federal land we have 1000 Site Steward volunteers who watch your archaeological sites in remote deserts.

In 1957, Arizona's leaders — with the support of reporters — created this State agency to preserve our cultural and natural resources and build rural economies. The original State Parks enabling bill was signed by a visionary, Governor Ernest McFarland, and funded through the General Fund and legislature.

The Parks are now generating more than $200 million annually in spending in these communities and proving to be the economic engines they were designed to be in 1957.

Another important effort by the agency is the "Arizona Main Street Program," an economic driver for small towns, which is being reinstated through the State Parks Historic Preservation Office.

Now we need you to help protect and preserve Arizona's natural and cultural resources. Please go on our Web site to volunteer, even if you only have one weekend to contribute.

We need leaders to serve on advisory boards, offer a unique skill or scientific knowledge, or have a passion for history and we'll welcome you into the Arizona State Parks family.

Most important, make your travel plans today to visit and enjoy your 27 Arizona State Parks, 900 State hiking trails, OHV trails and historic gems. For More Information Visit AZStateParks.com. See you in the parks — Bryan Martyn



Verde River Day Features Fishing, Hikes, Exhibits And More
Dead Horse Ranch State Park - Saturday, September 29

(Phoenix, Arizona - September 24, 2012) - Dead Horse Ranch State Park will celebrate its annual Verde River Day on Saturday, September 29th, 2012 from 9am to 3pm.

The activities during Verde River Day promote preservation and care of the environment by showcasing informative exhibits on the Verde's riparian habitat. Some of the day's events include environmental exhibits, hands-on-activities, fishing, canoeing and live entertainment.

The exhibit area opens at 9am and the opening ceremony officially begins Verde River Day at 10am with master of ceremonies, Leonard Miller, and keynote speaker Jay Ream, Arizona State Parks' Deputy Director of Parks and Development. The celebration brings together 40-plus nature-based exhibits, sandcastle building, a menagerie of live animals, non-stop activities from canoe rides (with or without assistance), to nature hikes, as well as continuous entertainment and local food vendors.

Guests of all ages are welcome to fish in the lagoon that is loaded with hundreds of pounds of catfish. Fishing licenses are not required during the scheduled Arizona Game & Fish Department's clinic hours. Poles, bait, and tackle are provided for all ages. Visitors may also experience nature's history through guided nature walks and short hikes.

The park entrance fee ($7) will be waived for this event. The camping fee at Dead Horse Ranch is $15 or $25 with hookups, the Quail Loop site is $30 and cabin rentals are $55. For more information call the park at (928) 634-5283 or visit AZStateParks.com.

For information about all 27 Arizona State Parks, the Trails and Off-Highway Vehicle Programs and State Historic Preservation Office call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703), visit the website at AZStateparks.com or Twitter/Facebook AZStateParks.



Arizona's Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) is now ready for Review by the Public

(Phoenix, Arizona - September 11, 2012) - The Arizona State Parks department is responsible for writing Arizona's Statewide Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) every five years. This plan sets the evaluation criteria to allocate the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund grants, along with other applicable grant programs consistent with the state's outdoor recreation priorities as identified by public participants in the research. This policy plan is now available online in a draft format for public review at AZStateParks.com and will be available for comment through October 7, 2012. The final plan will be implemented starting January 1, 2013.

Citizens interested in outdoor recreation in Arizona have participated with State Parks staff in the collection of recreation data since last May to build this first draft of the 2012 Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP). For more than 47 years, this offshore oil and gas leasing revenue fund, passed by Congress in 1965, has been used to plan, develop and expand outdoor recreation throughout America.

Arizona has received $60 million dollars from this fund toward the enhancement of outdoor recreation for Arizona communities and those monies were distributed through 728 grants administered by State Parks.

Arizona State Parks is committed to preparing a highly integrated outdoor recreation system for the future. This plan balances the recreational use and protection of natural and cultural resources. It also strengthens the awareness of the public between outdoor recreation with health benefits while also producing opportunities to enhance the economies and quality of life for residents. Recreation managers of cities, counties, the state and Federal government organizations in Arizona use this information for more specific recreation planning and budgeting. The plan also offers leadership opportunities to make decisions about the State's enhancement of outdoor recreation sites, programs and infrastructure.

For more information call the Arizona State Parks department headquarters at (602) 542-4174 or go to AZStateParks.com. If you would like to email program managers about this draft plan use: aspreply@azstateparks.gov. Feedback on the plan can also be submitted by mail at Arizona State Parks, 1300 W. Washington Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85007 (Re: SCORP draft plan).



Kay Daggett of Benson Appointed to Arizona State Parks Board by Governor Janice K. Brewer

Governor Janice K. Brewer has appointed Kay Daggett of Benson as the newest member of the Arizona State Parks Board. Daggett will replace Reese Woodling of Tucson, whose term expired earlier in the year.

Daggett has over 35 years of managerial experience with an emphasis in marketing and tourism development. She has worked at the City of Sierra Vista for over 10 years and is currently the Sierra Vista Public Affairs Manager. She was previously the Communications and Marketing Analyst as well as the Director of Tourism.

Daggett is a member of the Arizona Tourism Alliance and is a former member of the Tourism Advisory Council, Governor's Motion Picture and Television Advisory Commission, Cochise County Tourism Council, Arizona Film Commission and Arizona-Mexico Commission.

In 2011, the Arizona State Legislature changed Arizona Revised Statute §41-511 to have one member of the Arizona State Parks Board who would be professionally engaged in the tourism industry replacing one of two members in the livestock industry.

For more information about Arizona's 27 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities, go to the website at AZStateParks.com or call (602) 542-4174 or (800) 285-3703. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter at AZStateParks.



Oracle State Park Reopens on New Fall Schedule

(Phoenix, AZ - August 28, 2012) -- Oracle State Park Center for Environmental Education re-opens to the public on Saturday, Sept. 1, and will offer an array of programs, lectures, workshops, and special events on Saturdays only through the end of November. The park will be open to the public on those Saturdays from 8AM to 5PM and the cost will be $7 per vehicle.

School groups will be scheduled by reservation for September through November for environmental education programs on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.

Bird walks, plant walks, guided hikes, and tours of the historic Kannally ranch house will resume on September 1. Workshops on basket making with native grass, papermaking with local plants, and nature-journal making will be scheduled as well. A full lineup of activities, most of them free with park admission, will be posted and updated regularly on the park website: www.AZStateParks.com as well as the Friends of Oracle State Park website: www.friendsOSP.org

Don't miss an Oracle State Park event set for October 13 when the mesquite bean hammermill returns to grind people's beans into sweet, healthy baking flour. (More about the hammermill at www.desertharvesters.org) This desert harvest event will include the sale of mesquite flour baked goodies, other desert foods, children's activities, related talks, a plant sale, and live music. The non-profit Friends group is subsidizing the hammermill rental cost and a live band performance as part of its continuing support of the park's environmental education mission.

The park's signature field trip opportunities for school groups and scout troops will be offered on weekdays by reservation. The Oracle Adventure Program is for grades 1-3 and children will utilize the five senses to explore easy trails. The Oracle Odyssey offers grades 4-6 an opportunity to learn about habitat and the interrelationship between plants, animals, and people.

Be sure to contact Park Ranger Jennifer Rinio at jrinio@azstateparks.gov for information about the Park programs, to schedule a field trip, and to learn more about volunteering and training to be a school program guide.

Oracle State Park is a 4,000-acre wildlife refuge featuring the historic Kannally ranch house, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. From the ranch house patio and on many of the 15 miles of hiking trails, visitors can enjoy sweeping views of the Santa Catalina foothills, San Pedro River Valley, and Galiuro Mountain Range. The main entrance is off Mt. Lemmon Rd. in Oracle, and the Arizona Trail and equestrian-access entrance is off W. American Ave. in Oracle. The park has many spots with shaded picnic tables.

For more information about Arizona's 27 State Parks, State Trails System (800 trails), off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities, go to the website at AZStateParks.com or call (602) 542-4174 or (800) 285-3703. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter at AZStateParks



Arizona State Parks Gear Up for Busy Memorial Day Weekend

(Phoenix, AZ - May 23, 2012) - Few people think of the wonderful vacation spots they already own in rural Arizona locations when they are making weekend plans. Camping at Arizona's State Parks in the cool country offers economical and fascinating opportunities just a few hours from Arizona's largest cities and towns. When you are heading out to go hiking, fishing, horseback riding, swimming, biking, or birding, remember the State Parks have amenities that appeal to just about everyone in the family.

The three State Parks on the Colorado River include Lake Havasu, Buckskin Mountain and the River Island Unit, and Cattail Cove State. These parks are all busy throughout the summer with visitors swimming, boating, fishing, tubing and lounging on the beach, watching as others play on the river. Remember when playing on the Colorado River air temperatures range around 100 degrees & the water is 80 degrees, so spending the day in the river provides a cool retreat people from Arizona's blazing sun.

Arizona's State Parks provide more than 1,000 campsites for Memorial Day campers. Campers can now make reservations at parks such as Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area in Show Low to ensure a spot during the week or summer weekends or try a trip to Roper Lake in Safford, which is next to a retreat from the heat - Mount Graham.

Lyman Lake State Park will open this year on June 15. This remote State Park near Springerville usually has lots of room on weekends for fishing or waterskiing and a professional slalom race couse. If you are not a camper, stay in a cabin or yurt and enjoy hot showers, or take a swim on the beach. If you choose the yurts and cabins your family can stay for $40-55 a night.

Daytrippers can head out to the historic parks such as Fort Verde or Jerome State Historic Parks or or environmental parks such as Kartchner Caverns State Park (also has a campground), Tonto Natural Bridge State Park and Red Rock State Park.

No matter where you camp, there will be severe fire restrictions. No wood or charcoal fires or smoking are allowed on State Parks due to extremely dry grasses and trees. Also all types of fireworks are banned from use on any State Lands. To keep your family and public lands safe, it is best to use a propane stove and only smoke in vehicles.

Here are the camping opportunities and NEW this year are camping reservations which can be made on the internet at www.AZStateParks.com. Book early!!

Northern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds:

- Dead Horse Ranch State Park - (928) 634-5283 - Cottonwood - 150 campsites - fishing, boating (non-motorized), hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, guided trail rides.

- Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area - (928) 537-3680 - 92 hookup sites, 31 campsites without hookups, fishing, wildlife watching

- Lyman Lake State Park - (928) 337-4441 - 61 campsites, 4 yurts & 4 cabins, fishing, water skiing.

- Homolovi State Park - (928) 289-4106 - 53 campsites, Hopi Ruins, hiking.

- Slide Rock State Park - (928) 282-3034 - natural rock slide in a creek, picnicking

- Red Rock State Park - (928) 282-6907- daily guided nature walk/activities, hiking, photography. No camping.

Southern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds:

- Catalina State Park (520) 628-5798 - 120 campsites - 95 with hookups, 25 without, hiking, horse corrals

- Kartchner Caverns State Park (520) 586-2283 - 62 campsites - cave tour reservations now ONLINE.

- Lost Dutchman State Park (480) 982-4485 - 70 campsites, hiking into the Superstition Mountains.

- Patagonia Lake State Park (520) 287-6965 - 105 campsites, boats to rent, fishing, beach, birding

- Picacho Peak State Park (Closed for the summer - May 18 - September 14, 2011)

- Roper Lake State Park (928) 428-6760 - 71 campsites - rock hot tub, fishing.

Western Arizona State Parks Campgrounds:

- Alamo Lake State Park (928) 669-2088 - 250 campsites, excellent bass fishing, waterskiing, swimming.

- Buckskin Mountain State Park & River Island (928) 667-3231 - 126 campsites, water sports, cabanas, beach.

- Cattail Cove State Park (928) 855-1223 - 61 campsites. Boating lauches, hiking.

o - Lake Havasu State Park (928) 855-2784 - 45 campsites - boat launches, great park areas and swimming beach.

For information about Arizona State Parks call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703 or visit the website at AZStateParks.com to make campground and cave reservations. Join us at Twitter and Facebook at AZStateParks.



March Over to Fort Verde Days and Learn how Frontier Soldiers Lived in the late 1800's in Arizona

(Phoenix, Arizona - September 30, 2011) - Fort Verde State Historic Park will host the Fort Verde Days celebration on Oct 8-9, 2011. The celebration includes a parade at 10AM, living history presentations with the Buffalo Soldiers and re-enactors, special presentations, cavalry drills and a vintage baseball game at 2 PM. The weekend offers the public a chance to get a glimpse of the past, while celebrating Fort Verde Days in conjunction with even more events throughout the town of Camp Verde.

Travel back in time to experience Fort Verde's past as you hear tales about less-than-sumptuous food, hot wool uniforms, difficult living conditions, poor quality equipment and the everyday duties played out by the Verde Valley's residents. Fort Verde State Historic Park is home to four original adobe buildings and many military artifacts. Re-enactors will be on hand to provide living history presentations.

This event will be fun for the entire family. Celebrate this annual community event on an original military site while enjoying Camp Verde's southwestern style. For more information call the park at (928) 567-3275. The park entrance fee is waived for the weekend celebration.

Arizona State Parks offers 50% off regular day-use entrance for active military, Reserve, National Guard and state militia troops. There is a free annual pass offered for 100% disabled veterans who live in Arizona. For information about the disabled veteran pass call (602) 542-4174 or visit AZStateParks.com.

Fort Verde State Historic Park is located in downtown Camp Verde, Arizona. From Phoenix: I-17 to Exit 287; turn right onto Hwy 260 (east). Turn left on Finnie Flat Road, left on Hollamon St. for one block, park entry is on the right side of the street.

For more information about Arizona's 27 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Get updates about State Parks and programs on Facebook and Twitter (AZStateParks) and sign up for the monthly newsletter on the website.



ARIZONA'S 2012 ARCHAEOLOGY AND HERITAGE AWARENESS MONTH CELEBRATION

(Phoenix, AZ - October 1, 2011) -- For the entire month of March 2012, Arizona's State Historic Preservation Office will be coordinating activities throughout the state for the 29th annual celebration of Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month (AAHAM). These events will focus on current efforts to preserve our past by protecting our fragile and non-renewable cultural resources. AAHAM combines education with entertainment to reach both adults and children in an effort to teach responsible stewardship of our cultural resources. Museums, historical societies, tribes, agencies, parks, and archaeology organizations will be hosting events across the state; events are also planned in Arizona State Parks as part of their interpretive programs.

Proclaimed by the Governor each year, this celebration will feature prehistoric and historic site tours, exhibits, hikes, open houses, lectures, demonstrations and other activities throughout Arizona. A free statewide listing of these events and activities will be available in January by visiting the Parks website at www.AZStateParks.com.

The featured event for March is the ARIZONA ARCHAEOLOGY AND HERITAGE EXPO. This year's Expo will offer many educational attractions for archaeology and history buffs and will be located at the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix on Saturday, March 3, 2012, from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm. The Expo is open to the public and is FREE.

The AAHAM Expo will provide a special opportunity for visitors to learn more about why it is important to preserve archaeological sites and historic places, what archaeologists, historians, and tribal members do in their jobs, and about the prehistory and history of Arizona. The Expo will feature archaeology-related hands-on activities, craft demonstrations, and other fun and educational events. In addition, Boy Scout and Girl Scout merit badge requirements can be fulfilled at the Expo!

Special displays and booths by archaeological and historical organizations, museums, Native American tribes, state and federal agencies, and others will allow you to participate as an archaeologist might in their research today, or make crafts and tools that teach how prehistoric Native Americans and other early inhabitants survived in the Southwest. Storytellers, Native American demonstrators and entertainers, talks by archaeologists, and interactive activities will help make the past come alive! In addition, tours of archaeological sites, museums and historical period parks in and around the local area will be highlighted.

Free prize raffles will occur throughout both days, and ethnic foods will be available for purchase. The Expo will give visitors new insights into Arizona's many prehistoric, historic, and contemporary cultures, and will help instill a sense of stewardship for our state's fragile and nonrenewable heritage resources.

For more detailed information, call Ann Howard, Public Archaeology Programs Manager, at Arizona State Parks/SHPO (602-542-4174), or e-mail at ahoward@azstateparks.gov. For more information about Arizona State Parks Programs and the 27 State Parks call (602) 542-4174 (outside of County call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Arizona State Parks Board Authorizes Eight Off-Highway Recreation Fund Projects

(Phoenix, Arizona - September 29, 2011) - In 2008 the Arizona Legislature authorized a new Off-Highway Vehicle "Sticker Fund" which started producing revenues in January of 2009. A $25 fee is charged for off-highway vehicles each year and that sticker is then attached to the license plates of these vehicles.

Revenue from sticker sales amounts to almost $1 million per year with $1,241,725 million allocated so far from the OHV Recreation Fund to fund more than 25 projects. On September 16, 2011 $396,010 from this fund was awarded to eight new projects that will benefit communities through communication, mitigation and enforcement of laws in OHV areas.

The eight funded projects include; $66,000 for staff and equipment to work at the Table Mesa and Boulders areas through the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), $13,000 for fencing for water areas near the BLM Vulture Mountain Trail, $5,500 for the BLM Table Mesa Trail System access guides, $70,600 for the BLM to manage Little Pan Road renovation and mitigation; $14,255 for Tonto National Forest purchase of a Polaris Ranger UTV to be used in the Cave Creek District by the Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition and AZ Trail Riders to support maintenance work, signs, and equipment; $95,475 for the Arizona Game and Fish Department for five UTVs and five trailers for wildlife managers and two quads for safety training; $104,800 for the Tonto National Forest to repair 36 miles of OHV routes north of Bartlett Lake Road and $26,380 for repairs and habitat protection South of Bartlett Lake Road.

In addition to the sticker funds for these projects, $92,000 came from Federal Recreational Trails funding to support the BLM Vulture Mountain Trail repair and $76,000 from corporate and nonprofit partnerships to support these OHV projects.

The Arizona State Parks/OHV Recreation Fund (gas taxes) has been in existence since 1991 and has been used for mitigation and enforcement on trails as well as an OHV map guide, provide riding facilities, OHV education, trail signage, and other rural OHV maps. Motorized trail project applications are reviewed periodically by the Off-Highway Vehicle Advisory Group and funded under authority from the State Parks Board. In addition to trail and facility improvements, the funds can be used for mitigation of damage caused by OHV activities, cultural and environmental compliances, and education projects/programs and law enforcement.

The Arizona State Parks department develops the OHV Recreation Plan every five years with input from land managing agency staff, OHV user organizations, individual OHV users, and the general public. The 2010 State Trails Plan is at : http://azstateparks.com/publications. For more information call (602) 542-4174 (outside of County call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Kartchner Caverns State Park BUG NIGHT August 27

(Phoenix, AZ - August 10, 2011) -- Kartchner Caverns State Park is hosting a special science series program on August 27th at 6 PM. The public will explore the complex and often misunderstood world of BUGS--those unique and common invertebrates and insects that choose Kartchner Caverns State Park and Southeast Arizona for their "home" and bring balance and completeness to its ecosystem. The cost is only $6 per carload of guests, but bring a light jacket, and a flashlight. The Bat Cafe will be open for Bug Night.

Brochymena_molt01.jpgStink Bug

Two entomologists, Robert Pape and Carl Olson will reveal to your eyes and minds to the dynamic field of entomology, and reveal how and why ALL bugs are good.

Robert Pape currently serves as a volunteer research scientist in Arizona State Park's RIM (resource inventory-monitoring) program, and will start our evening off revealing how our understanding of the underground world of cave invertebrates at Kartchner Caverns has been enriched over the past few years. He serves as a Principal Investigator on the re-inventorying of cave invertebrates at Kartchner Caverns State Park. Bob will share the results of the latest scientific inventorying of cave invertebrates at Kartchner Caverns, which reveals a diverse community of invertebrates that flourish and provide AZ State Parks useful information regarding the management of this live cavern system.

Megachile_w_pollen_AY.jpgBee

Our second guest speaker of the night will be Carl Olson. Carl is the Associated Curator of the Entomology Research Insect Collection and Lecturer at the University of Arizona, Department of Entomology and the Center for Insect Science. He is heavily involved in community extension, educating the public on the benefits of ALL bugs, and responds to thousands of insect inquiries every year from people trying to explain, "what's bugging them". Don't miss Carl's intriguing and entertaining presentation on bugs. His talk will be followed by an outdoor demonstration and exploration of Kartchner's insect world.

Kartchner Caverns cave tours can be booked one year in advance with Throne/Rotunda and Big Room tours available all winter. The Big Room is closed Apr. 16-Oct 1 so the mother bats can roost and raise their young in that part of the cavern, and the Rotunda/Throne Room is closed in order to allow for scientific monitoring and assessment from October 10 through December 14. Prices for the tours are $22.95 for adults and $12.95 for children age (7-13) and customers may book up to a maximum of 20 tickets. Tours start at 9AM and go throughout the day until 4:30PM. Individual and small group reservations can still be made by phone, however school and commercial group tour operators must call the ticket reservation line at (520) 586-2283.

Phidippus_pius_DSC001.jpgJumping Spider

The Discovery Center at the park features museum exhibits, a large gift shop, regional displays, a theater, educational information about the caverns and the surrounding landscape. There are also campgrounds, hiking trails, lockers, shaded picnic areas, a cafe, an amphitheater, and a hummingbird garden. The camping, picnic areas, large group ramadas and barbeque/dance areas are available for group tour bookings. For more information about all of Arizona's State Parks call (602) 542-4174 (outside of metro area call toll-free at 800-285-0373) or visit the website at AZStateParks.com, "like us" on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at (AZStateParks.)



Kayaking 101: Learn Basic Safety, Paddling And Navigation Tips

(Peoria) – Have you ever wondered what it would be like to skim across a flat water lake in a kayak? Wonder no more, adventurous first-time paddlers now have an opportunity to attend a Get Wet: Introduction to Kayaking class that covers safety, paddling techniques, navigation tips, equipment and practice time on the lake.

"Lake Pleasant has teamed up with Cabela's again this summer to host three Get Wet: Introduction to Kayaking on-water paddling sessions," stated Terry Gerber, Lake Pleasant Regional Park Interpretive Ranger.

"The class is $35 per person which includes a one hour class at Cabela's and three hours of on-water instruction at the Desert Outdoor Center from the park rangers. We're committed to making this an enjoyable experience for those enrolled in the class so we provide the kayaks, paddles and life-jackets. We just ask that everyone come prepared to have a good time," added Gerber.

The agencies are currently accepting enrollment for the Friday, August 5 session which will take place at 6 p.m. in Cabela's Painted Desert Conference Room located at 9380 W. Glendale Avenue in Glendale. Interested parties are encouraged to contact (623) 872-6700 to reserve seats as space is limited and demand is high. Participants must be 12-years or older to attend the on-water portion of the program.

On Saturday, August 13 participants will be able to test their skills at a three hour on-water session in Honeymoon Cove at the Desert Outdoor Center at Lake Pleasant. The Desert Outdoor Center at Lake Pleasant is located at 41402 N. 87th Avenue in Peoria. Participants will be instructed on what to wear and where to go for the on-water session. For more information on the event or upcoming Get Wet: Introduction to Kayaking programs, visit www.maricopa.gov/parks/lake_pleasant.



Arizonans Urged to Vote for Dead Horse Ranch State Park to Win $100,000 in National Coca-Cola LivePositively Contest

(Phoenix, AZ - July 19, 2011) Arizonans have an opportunity to help their State Parks win $100,000 by participating online with the "Live Positively, America's Favorite Park Program" being coordinated by Coca-Cola. The "America is Your Park" program encourages everyone to vote their favorite Arizona State Park by going to www.livepositively.com. The real points will add up though, if you post on your Facebook page with stories and pictures while you are at Dead Horse Ranch State Park because each post is then worth 5 points! Or vote daily during the week...those votes will add up quickly for the park.

Jay Ream, Assistant Director for Arizona's State Parks said, "We would like the public to follow our lead and consolidate their votes so Arizona State Parks can win. We polled our park rangers to get a consensus on one park so we have a better chance to win this amazing prize for the whole system," said Ream. "We believe Arizonans have the greatest passion for all their State Parks and the outdoors so they will join us in voting for Dead Horse Ranch State Park." The Coca-Cola Live Positively initiative will award a $100,000 recreation grant to the park with the most votes, a $50,000 grant to the second-place park and a $25,000 grant to the third-place park. These grants will help buy new equipment, restore activity areas, build trails or simply make the park an overall better place for you and your family.

State Park rangers decided that Dead Horse Ranch State Park in Central Arizona, is a great choice as the park is a base park for traveling around to five State and three National parks in the Verde Valley. You can camp at the park and visit Jerome, Red Rock, Slide Rock and Fort Verde State Parks and there are three National Parks in the Sedona Verde Valley as well.

Dead Horse Ranch has lagoons for fishing, is bounded by the Verde River for canoeing, swimming and is part of one of Arizona's Important Birding areas so it is a haven for endangered and rare birds. The park offers camping cabins, tent and large RV sites with reservations online so families can always plan well in advance to go camping.

While we want you to vote as many times as possible for Dead Horse Ranch State Park, it is more important that you also visit your favorite park. Votes will be tallied on September 6, 2011. So hurry! Go to www.livepositively.com/#/Americasparks/vote and vote for Dead Horse Ranch State Park.

The National Association of State Park Directors (NASPD) established the America's State Parks alliance (www.americasstateparks.com) to mobilize and educate the public and policy makers on the positive impact state parks have on public health and local economies. The Alliance is launching many national fund-raising initiatives to support America's parks. Americans demonstrated a strong demand for budget-friendly outdoor recreation and cultural tourism, with more than 725 million visits to state parks in 2009.

The Arizona State Parks department operates 27 State Parks and historic sites in Arizona and hosts 2.3 million visitors. These visitors then generate $266 million in spending that supports the economies and jobs in rural communities in Arizona. For more information about Arizona's State Parks visit Arizona State Parks , connect to our FaceBook & Twitter sites at AZStateParks or call (602) 542-4174.



Arizona State Parks

Time to plan those Summer State Park Vacations!

1156 campsites (some on river islands!) Cabins, Yurts, Historic Forts, Beaches, Caverns, Rock Slide, Moonlight Hikes, Fishing, Waterskiing, Horseback Riding, Mountain Biking, Tubing, Picnicking, Lounging, Travertine Arch, Birding, Rock Hottub.

(Phoenix, AZ -July 8, 2011) - Have you planned that summer vacation? Worried about high gas prices and overnight costs? Why not stay in Arizona where you have a short driving trip to your destination with all kinds of activities packaged nicely in the State Parks system! An annual pass for day-use is $75 or $200 for the premium river pass and 4 people can go to the State Parks every day of the year! Did you know there are 800 hiking trails in the State of Arizona Trails System and maps of each one available? Another new update is that the State Parks camping reservations can be accessed online this summer for the first time.

In southern Arizona, the best good news is that Catalina State Park, just north of Tucson, has re-opened after the recent rains. Campfire restrictions will still be in place, however throughout the Forests and in all of the State Parks. Daytrippers can head out to day-use and historic parks or environmental parks such as: Kartchner Caverns State Park; Yuma Quartermaster Depot and Territorial Prison State Parks; Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park; and Tubac Presidio State Historic Park. Picacho Peak State Park is closed due to the hot summer weather.

In Northern Arizona a nice one-day turnaround vacation in the Sedona Verde Valley is: Fort Verde, Jerome, Red Rock, and Slide Rock State Parks. Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area in Show Low is a cool mountain retreat with top fishing areas and Lyman Lake near Springerville will be open through Oct. 17. Cabins, yurts, swimming beaches, and water skiing are favorite activities in this northern park. Near Payson, Tonto Natural Bridge State Park is now open seven days a week and Riordan Mansion, in Flagstaff, is open seven days a week through Labor Day as well.

Go West a couple of hours from Phoenix and you reach the three Colorado River State Parks for camping, swimming, boating, and fishing. Alamo Lake near Wenden is a nice, quiet bass fishing lake, but mostly used by water skiiers in the summer. Water play is great along the river with air temperatures ranging around 100 degrees and the water a nice cool 80 degrees, making this area wildly popular all summer long.

No matter where you camp, there will be campfire restrictions due to the extreme drought and fire danger. Remember if you cause a fire under fire restrictions it may result in substantial fines and jail time. To keep your family and public lands safe it is best to use a propane stove and only smoke in vehicles.

CAMPING PARKS - RESERVATIONS

AZStateParks.com or call (520) 586-2283
NO campfires or charcoal.

Northern Arizona State Parks

Dead Horse Ranch State Park - (928) 634-5283 - Cottonwood - 150 campsites - fishing, boating (non-motorized), hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, guided trail rides.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails

Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area - (928) 537-3680-92 hookup sites, 31 campsites, fishing-swimming.
Camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

Lyman Lake State Park - (928) 337-4441 - 61 campsites & 4 yurts / 4 cabins, fishing, waterskiing.
Camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

Homolovi State Park - (928) 289-4106 - 53 campsites, Ancestral Hopi villages, podcast tours, hiking.
Camp cook stoves, smoking in vehicles only, no smoking on trails.

Southern Arizona State Parks

Catalina State Park (520) 628-5798 - RE-OPENED July 8 and taking reservations online for 40 campsites horse trails and corrals, dayuse hiking.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Kartchner Caverns State Park (520) 586-2283 - 60 campsites - cave tours
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Lost Dutchman State Park (480) 982-4485 - 70 campsites, hiking into Superstitions.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Patagonia Lake State Park (520) 287-6965 - 75 campsites, boats to rent, fishing, beach.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Picacho Peak State Park (Closed - May 18 - September 14, 2011) due to high temperatures.

Roper Lake State Park (928) 428-6760 - 71 campsites - hot tub, fishing.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails. (Call the park for reservations)

Western Arizona State Parks

Alamo Lake State Park (928) 669-2088 - 250 campsites, excellent bass fishing, waterskiing, swimming.
Cook stoves only, no smoking on trails. (Call for reservations)

Buckskin Mountain State Park & River Island (928) 667-3231 - 126 campsites, water sports, cabanas, beach.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Cattail Cove State Park (928) 855-1223 - 61 campsites. launch ramp, dog beach.
Camp cook Stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Lake Havasu State Park (928) 855-2784 - 47 campsites - boat launches, great park areas and swimming beach.
Camp cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

For information about Arizona State Parks call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703 or visit the website at AZStateParks.com to make campground and cave reservations. Join us at Twitter and Facebook at AZStateParks.



Governor's Awards Presented for Arizona Public Archaeology and Heritage Preservation

(Phoenix, AZ - July 1, 2011) - The Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission recognized Dr. Raymond Thompson last Friday with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Thompson is a Professor of Archaeology at the University of Arizona and has served for 34 years as director of the Arizona State Museum. Also honored by the Commission was "Midcentury Marvels: Commercial Architecture of Phoenix 1945-1975," a book selected from a field of ten to receive the Governor's Heritage Preservation Grand Award. These honorees were among fifteen other individuals and projects recognized at the 9th Annual Arizona Historic Preservation Conference held at the University Park Marriott in Tucson on June 24.

Presenting the awards were Renee Bahl, executive director of Arizona State Parks; James Garrison, Arizona State Historic Preservation Officer; Dr. Connie Stone, vice chair of the Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission; and Jim McPherson, board president of the Arizona Preservation Foundation.

Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission Awards in Public Archaeology

These awards are presented to individuals and/or programs that have significantly contributed to the protection and preservation of, and education about, Arizona's non-renewable archaeological resources. Honorees included:
o Scott Wood (Professional Archaeologist)

o Cherie Freeman (Avocational Archaeologist)

o Roger & Lesley McPeek (Site Steward)

o The Hopi Tribe (Tribal Archaeology)

o Kim Savage and the Archaeological Research Institute (Government Agency)

o The Redemptorist Society (Private Non-Profit Entity)

o Dr. Raymond Thompson (Lifetime Achievement)

Governor's Heritage Preservation Honor Awards

These awards recognize people, organizations, and projects that represent outstanding achievements in preserving Arizona's prehistoric and historic resources. Honorees included:

o Randy Oden, Oden Contruction & Michael Sellers, Sellers & Sons, Tucson

o Modern Architecture Preservation Project (MAPP), Tucson

o Douglas Mansion Rehabilitation Project, Jerome

o "Midcentury Marvels: Commercial Architecture of Phoenix 1945-1975" (Grand Award Winner)

o El Tiradito & La Pilita Museum Rehabilitation, Tucson

o Florence Townsite Preservation Design Guidelines

o Florida Station Adaptive Re-Use & Rehabilitation Project

o Tovrea Castle Rehabilitation Project, Phoenix

o Poster Frost Mirto - Fort Lowell Master Plan & Preservation Plan, Tucson

o John Madsen (Lifetime Achievement)

About Arizona State Parks

Arizona State Parks protects and preserves 30 State Parks and Natural Areas. The agency also includes the State Trails Program, outdoor-related Grants Program, the State Historic Preservation Office, as well as the Off-Highway Vehicle Program, and more. Arizona State Parks provides over 1,400 camping and RV sites throughout the parks and manages 8 of the top 25 most visited natural attractions in Arizona. For more information, visit http://azstateparks.com/

About Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission

The Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission has played an important role in the development of Arizona's multi-component, award-winning educational programs in archaeology. Governor Bruce Babbitt signed the legislation creating the Commission on March 26, 1985. The purpose of the Commission is to advise the State Historic Preservation Office on a variety of archaeological issues important to Arizona. For more information, visit http://azstateparks.com/committees/GAAC.html

About Arizona Preservation Foundation

The Foundation is Arizona's only nonprofit statewide historic preservation organization. Founded in 1979, the Foundation is dedicated to preserving Arizona's historical, archaeological, architectural, and cultural resources. The Foundation offers a variety of services and programs, including: Governor's Heritage Preservation Awards; conferences and workshops on topics such as heritage tourism, adobe conservation, maintenance of historic properties, and government ordinances' impact on local preservation; speaker's bureau for groups and classes; and Arizona's Most Endangered Places List. For more information, visit http://www.azpreservation.org or on Facebook.

Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission Public Archaeology Awards June 24, 2011

Scott Wood

We are pleased to present the award for Professional Archaeologist to J. Scott Wood. As the lead archaeologist for the Tonto National Forest, Scott has shared his knowledge and expertise through teaching and mentoring hundreds of volunteers, by serving as advisor to the Desert Foothills and Rim Country chapters of the Arizona Archaeological Society. He's supervised volunteers in many archaeological projects, as well as interpretive projects at the Sears Kay and Goat Camp sites. He's also served as one of the primary instructors for volunteers with the Arizona Site Steward Program. Scott's legendary hikes and field trips have motivated countless citizens to sustain their passionate efforts on behalf of Arizona's archaeological heritage.

Cherie Freeman

The award winner for Avocational Archaeologist, Cherie Freeman, has contributed over 10,000 hours to the Arizona Site Steward Program, monitoring sites and training new volunteers. She's also devoted thousands of hours as a volunteer for the Arizona State Museum and the Center for Desert Archaeology. Her contributions include fieldwork, analysis, interpretation, and collections management. Cherie has served as a valuable assistant for many doctoral dissertations and Paleoindian research projects. I'm pleased to announce that the Arizona State Parks Foundation is accepting donations to the Site Steward Program Fund in honor of Cherie Freeman. As of June 21st, the fund has accepted almost $400 donated in tribute to Cherie.

Roger and Lesley McPeek

Roger and Lesley McPeek have earned their award in thousands of hours devoted to the Arizona Site Steward Program. They currently serve as Regional Coordinators for the BLM's Arizona Strip Office and much of the Kaibab National Forest. Their work includes training and managing 60 volunteers, who patrol more than 140 archaeological sites in a rugged and remote area. They've also assisted with more than 50 field surveys and in mapping and recording more than 100 sites. Roger and Lesley have often served as educators to the public and reliable assistants to professional archaeologists. We are proud to honor the McPeeks as role models for the Site Steward Program.

The Hopi Tribe

The Hopi Tribe is honored for its partnership with Arizona State Parks to re-open Homolovi State Park. The prehistoric sites in the park are important in the cultural heritage of the Tribe. When Homolovi was closed, exposing its sites to vandalism, the Hopi Tribal Council unanimously passed a resolution to work with State Parks to assist with its operation and maintenance. The Tribe will contribute funding toward staffing and operations. The Hopi people will participate in educational activities to teach visitors about cultural history and traditions. We commend the Hopi Tribe for its vital role in reopening Homolovi State Park, protecting irreplaceable archaeological sites, and sharing its heritage through interpretive programs.

Kim Savage and the Archaeological Research Institute

Kim Savage is the Public Outreach Coordinator for the Archaeological Research Institute at Arizona State University. The Institute manages important archaeological collections, with public education key to its mission. Kim has developed many innovative, hands-on lessons that promote critical thinking skills and understanding of archaeology as a science. Her activities are among the most popular at the annual Arizona Archaeology Expo. Kim contributes behind the scenes to planning each Expo, as well as other educational events. She's also trained many students and volunteers in public outreach. Kim Savage's skills, energy and enthusiasm contribute greatly to planning and execution of educational programming throughout Arizona.

The Redemptorist Society

The nonprofit Redemptorist Society of Arizona deserves its award for its efforts to protect archaeological sites, educate the public, and add to scientific knowledge. Since 1967, the Society has purchased several parcels of land northwest of Tucson. These areas include many archaeological sites, the most notable being the Picture Rocks Petroglyph Site. The Society has worked in partnership with the Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, the Arizona Site Steward Program, and citizen volunteers to foster the protection, study, and public enjoyment of this important prehistoric site. The Society is now supporting a partnership effort to nominate the Picture Rocks group of archaeological sites to the National Register of Historic Places.

Dr. Raymond Thompson

Dr. Raymond Thompson served as the Director of the Arizona State Museum for 34 years, while also a Professor of Archaeology at the University of Arizona. Ray presided over the modernization of antiquities laws at the state and national level. As past president of the Society for American Archaeology, he was instrumental in the creation of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. His achievements in research and museum management were equaled by his dedication to promoting stewardship of archaeological resources--what today we call cultural resource management. Dr. Thompson assisted Indian tribes in developing their own museums. He also established cooperative relationships with Mexican archaeologists and institutions. In 1998, Dr. Thompson received the Distinguished Service Award from the Society for American Archaeology. We are pleased to present him with Arizona's Lifetime Achievement Award.

Governor's Heritage Preservation Honors Awards - June 24, 2011

Randy Oden & Mike Sellers

Between 2004 and 2011, Oden Construction, working together with Sellers and Sons as general contractor, provided outstanding construction services for a number of Pima County-funded projects. While it was Randy Oden and his crew who performed the majority of the specialized craftsmanship for each project, it was Mike Sellers who provided logistical and contract support. Mike frequently augmented Randy's effort with his own craftspeople when needed. Each project was a team effort that achieved excellent results. Joint projects include: the Colossal Cave Headquarters Building, CCC Camp SP-10-A, Agua Caliente Ranch House, Old Vail Post Office, Canoa Ranch, Fort Lowell Officer's Quarters, Santa Cruz County Courthouse, and Camp Naco.

Modern Architecture Preservation Project

The Modern Architecture Preservation Project - also known as MAPP - is an all-volunteer, non-profit 501-C-3 organization founded in 2004. MAPP is dedicated to raising awareness of the value of architecture of the Modern Movement in Tucson and providing assistance in identifying, documenting, and preserving local modern architecture. One project - the MODERN 50 - identifies the best examples of the area's modern architecture and gives the public a chance to view many of the structures through tours in partnership with the southern Arizona chapter of the American Institute of Architects as well as an online map.

Arizona State Parks, Yavapai County, Town of Jerome, and Jerome Historical Society: A Partnership Nomination for the Stabilization of Douglas Mansion at Jerome State Historic Park

Jerome's Douglas Mansion suffered a severe threat to the operation of the state park and to the safety of employees and the public when large sections of the original cement plaster and support beams fell to the ground. Arizona State Parks, the Town of Jerome, Jerome Historical Society, and Yavapai County worked together along with other partners to raise the funds necessary and to see the rehabilitation work completed to reopen - for all of our benefit - this important local landmark and state park.

Midcentury Marvels

Between 1940 and 1980, Phoenix grew from a small town of 65,000 residents to a city with 790,000 residents. During this time, the period revival styles of the early 20th century gave way to modernism. This was the timeframe that many of Phoenix's most recognizable buildings were built. "Midcentury Marvels: Commercial Architecture of Phoenix 1945-1975" tells the story of this remarkable period in Phoenix history. The City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Office and Ryden Architects teamed up to produce this high quality, coffee table book.

El Tiradito & La Pilita Museum Rehabilitation, Tucson

El Tiradito Shrine and La Pilita building were both in need of major repair. The shrine had deteriorated to the point that it was in danger of collapsing. Parts of the adobe walls at La Pilita had melted away. In 2010, the La Pilita Association sought assistance from the City of Tucson Historic Preservation Office to save both structures. The City hired Sellers and Sons, Oden Construction, and Poster Frost Murto to successfully restore the local historic structures.

2009 Florence Townsite Historic District Preservation Design Guidelines

The Town of Florence and WLB Group worked together to update the Florence Townsite Historic District Preservation Design Guidelines. The result was a modern, user-friendly, and innovative document that will facilitate appropriate renovation and redevelopment efforts in the District. The adopted guidelines guide rehabilitation, additions, and new development and will preserve original design features and ensure compatibility between new the old.

Florida Station Adaptive Re-Use and Rehabilitation Project

Florida Station is the administrative headquarters for the 80-square-mile Santa Rita Experimental Range. The 14 buildings on the site were built between 1922 and 1936. In 2009, Poster Frost Murto created conceptual design for six of these buildings based on the preliminary findings of University of Arizona Professor Brooks Jeffrey and graduate student Teresa Gredig. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funds were used to complete a number of the recommended projects.

Tovrea Castle Rehabilitation

In late 2009, the City of Phoenix completed an extensive $2.5 million rehabilitation on historic Tovrea Castle (also known as the wedding cake building). When the City acquired the property in 1993, they found the structure to be severely damaged due to water seepage. Rehabilitation work, which began in 2005, included, among a whole host of issues, asbestos and lead abatement; restoration of the original stucco skin, doors, and windows; repair of the original wood floor and fixtures; and repair of ornamental Art Deco painting. The City plans to open Tovrea Castle to the public next year, our Centennial of statehood.

Fort Lowell Master Plan & Restoration Plan

During a thirteen-month public planning process, the Tucson architectural firm of Poster Frost Murto worked to formulate a preservation and master plan for Fort Lowell targeted at a newly-acquired portion of the historic site to be included in the park. PFM had to balance the needs of a challenging site; plus two local governing bodies, various preservation organizations and committees, tribal interests, public opinion, transportation routes, and a unique collection of rare and fragile adobe structures.

John Madsen

John H. Madsen is Associate Curator of Archaeology (Emeritus) at the Arizona State Museum at the nearby University of Arizona. During a portion of his tenure at ASM, John administered five statutes that protected prehistoric and historic sites and paleontological deposits on Arizona state lands. From 2001 until his retirement in 2010, John also administered two statutes that apply to the discovery of human remains and specific classes of artifacts on state and private lands. John helped form the Arizona Site Steward program in the 1980s and led the effort to place Tumamoc Hill on the National Register of Historic Places.



Arizona State Parks Updates, Fire Restrictions And Reservations Information

(Phoenix, AZ -June 7, 2011) - The Arizona State Parks staff are reporting updates regarding days and hours for the parks, fire restrictions and closures that will affect campers and day-users to the parks. It is important for everyone to know that many of the camping parks are now taking reservations online so you can reserve your campsite in advance of your vacation.

Tonto Natural Bridge State Park and Riordan Mansion State Historic Park are both going to being open seven days a week for the summer starting June 28, 2011 and through Labor Day.

Unfortunately Catalina State Park will be closed as of June 9, 2011 because it is part of the surrounding Coronado National Forest and in danger due to potential wildfires. Picacho Peak State Park is closed due to the hot summer weather and staff there will assist the other busy parks.

The three Colorado River State Parks are still great opportunities to spend your entire vacation camping, swimming and boating as well as Alamo Lake State Park that has many campsites. The Cholla boat launch at Alamo Lake will be closed through October for repairs. Remember on the river the air temperatures range around 100 degrees & the water is 80 degrees, making water sports wildly popular in the summer.

Yuma Territorial Prison State Park is open Thursdays-Mondays 9-5 PM and the Yuma Quartermaster Depot State Park is closed Mondays starting June 1 through September 30. The Yuma Territorial Prison State Park will be closed for renovations August 6-21, 2011.

Fool Hollow Lake Recreation area in Show Low will be busy on weekends, but during the week the campsites are usually available. Lyman Lake near Springerville will be open June 17-Oct. 17 where there are cabins, yurts, a swimming beach and hot showers. Park staff are hoping that by June 17 there will be reduced smoke invading the park so the summer will be enjoyable for campers (watch the webpage for Lyman Lake updates.) Daytrippers can head out to day-use and historic parks or environmental parks such as Kartchner Caverns State Park, Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park, and Patagonia Lake in southern Arizona.

No matter where you camp, there will be campfire restrictions due to the extreme drought and fire danger. Remember if you cause a fire under fire restrictions it may result in substantial fines and jail time. To keep your family and public lands safe it is best to use a propane stove and only smoke in vehicles.

Northern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds

* Dead Horse Ranch State Park - (928) 634-5283 - Cottonwood - 150 campsites - fishing, boating (non-motorized), hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, guided trail rides. (online reservations) Campfires: wood/charcoal in grills, camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area - (928) 537-3680-92 hookup sites, 31 campsites,fishing-swimming. Campfires: camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails (online reservations)

* Lyman Lake State Park - (928) 337-4441 - 61 campsites & 4 yurts / 4 cabins, fishing, waterskiing. Campfires: camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Homolovi State Park - (928) 289-4106 - 53 campsites, Hopi Ruins, hiking. Campfires: camp cook stoves, smoking in vehicles only, no smoking on trails.

* Slide Rock State Park - (928) 282-3034 - natural rock slide in a creek, hiking. No camping. Campfires: no fires, no smoking on trails.

* Red Rock State Park - (928) 282-6907- No camping, Campfires: no campfires, no smoking on trails.

Southern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds

* Catalina State Park (520) 628-5798 - CLOSED due to Coronado National Forest Fire restrictions

* Kartchner Caverns State Park (520) 586-2283 - 60 campsites - cave tours (online reservations). Campfires: camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Lost Dutchman State Park (480) 982-4485 - 70 campsites, hiking into Superstitions. Campfires: charcoal only in grills, camp cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Patagonia Lake State Park (520) 287-6965 - 107 campsites, boats to rent, fishing, beach. (online reservations) Campfires: cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

* Picacho Peak State Park (Closed - May 18 - September 14, 2011) due to high temperatures. * Roper Lake State Park (928) 428-6760 - 71 campsites - hot tub, fishing. Campfires: cook stoves only, no smoking on trails.

Western Arizona State Parks Campgrounds

* Alamo Lake State Park (928) 669-2088 - 250 campsites, excellent bass fishing, waterskiing, swimming. Campfires: wood/charcoal in grills, cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Buckskin Mountain State Park & River Island (928) 667-3231 - 126 campsites, water sports, cabanas, beach. (online reservations June 10)

* Campfires: wood/charcoal in grills, cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Cattail Cove State Park (928) 855-1223 - 61 campsites. launch ramp, dog beach. (online reservations) Campfires: wood/charcoal in grills, cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

* Lake Havasu State Park (928) 855-2784 - 47 campsites - boat launches, great park areas and swimming beach. (online reservations)

Campfires: wood/charcoal in grills, cook stoves, no smoking on trails.

For information about Arizona State Parks call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703 or visit the website at Arizona State Parks to make campground and cave reservations. Join us at Twitter and Facebook at AZStateParks.



Arizona State Parks Ready for Busy Memorial Day Weekend

(Phoenix, AZ - May 18, 2011) - Looking for an economical idea your summer vacation? Camping at State Parks in the cool country is a good option for hiking and fishing, but you can also head west for the three State Parks on the Colorado River to spend your entire vacation camping, swimming and boating. Remember on the river the air temperatures range around 100 degrees & the water is 80 degrees, making water sports wildly popular in the summer.

Arizona's State Parks provide more than 1,000 campsites for Memorial Day campers. Parks such as Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area in Show Low are booking quickly and Roper Lake in Safford is popular since it is next to Mount Graham. Lyman Lake near Springerville will be open June 17-Oct. 17 and the park has cabins, yurts, a swimming beach and hot showers. If you choose the yurts and cabins your family can stay for $35-$50 a night. The campsites in the parks also offer many amenities, with the most important being hot showers!

Daytrippers can head out to the historic parks or environmental parks such as Kartchner Caverns State Park, Tonto Natural Bridge State Park and Red Rock State Park.

No matter where you camp, there will be some campfire restrictions so always check with rangers before you build a fire. Remember if you cause a fire under fire restrictions it may result in substantial fines and jail time. To keep your family and public lands safe it is best to use a propane stove and only smoke in vehicles.

Here are the camping opportunities and NEW this year is camping reservations can be made on the internet at www.AZStateParks.com. But book early as this will be a busy summer.

Northern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds:

* Dead Horse Ranch State Park - (928) 634-5283 - Cottonwood - 150 campsites - fishing, boating (non-motorized), hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, guided trail rides, campfires in fire rings.

* Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area - (928) 537-3680 - 92 hookup sites, 31 campsites, great fishing and swimming. Some fire restrictions.

* Lyman Lake State Park - (928) 337-4441 - 61 campsites & 4 yurts / 4 cabins, fishing, waterskiing. Some fire restrictions. No smoking while hiking.

* Homolovi State Park - (928) 289-4106 - 53 campsites, Hopi Ruins, hiking. Campfires/smoking in developed areas only. No smoking while hiking.

* Slide Rock State Park - (928) 282-3034 - natural rock slide in a creek, hiking. No smoking except in vehicles. No fires, including charcoal and gas.

* Red Rock State Park - (928) 282-6907- No camping. Lots of hiking opportunities but no smoking on the trails.

Southern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds:

* Catalina State Park (520) 628-5798 - 125 campsites, hiking, corrals for horses. Charcoal and propane fires only, wood campfires not allowed.

* Kartchner Caverns State Park (520) 586-2283 - 60 campsites - cave tours now ONLINE. Propane only. Smoking in camp area or vehicle, no smoking while hiking.

* Lost Dutchman State Park (480) 982-4485 - 70 campsites, hiking into Superstitions. Charcoal and propane fires only, wood campfires not allowed, no smoking while hiking.

* Patagonia Lake State Park (520) 287-6965 - 107 campsites, boats to rent, fishing, beach. Campfires ok in designated grills, must provide own firewood, no gathering or cutting on park property. Smoking in camp areas only, no smoking while hiking.

* Picacho Peak State Park (Closed for the summer - May 18 - September 14, 2011)

* Roper Lake State Park (928) 428-6760 - 71 campsites - hot tub, fishing. Campfires and smoking restricted to developed areas only, no smoking while hiking.

Western Arizona State Parks Campgrounds:

* Alamo Lake State Park (928) 669-2088 - 250 campsites, excellent bass fishing, waterskiing, swimming. Campfires and smoking in designed areas only.

* Buckskin Mountain State Park & River Island (928) 667-3231 - 126 campsites, water sports, cabanas, beach. Campfires in designated grills, no smoking while hiking.

* Cattail Cove State Park (928) 855-1223 - 61 campsites. No wood fires, charcoal for cooking within a campsite or on a grill on the beach. Smoking - campsites and beach only.

* Lake Havasu State Park (928) 855-2784 - 47 campsites - boat launches, great park areas and swimming beach. Campfires in fire-rings call for details, smoking in camp areas, no smoking while hiking.

For information about Arizona State Parks call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703 or visit the website at AZStateParks.com to make campground and cave reservations. Join us at Twitter and Facebook at AZStateParks.



ARIZONANS URGED TO VOTE FOR KARTCHNER CAVERNS TO WIN $100,000 IN NATIONAL CONTEST

(Phoenix, AZ - July 30, 2010) Arizonans have an opportunity to help their State Parks win $100,000 by participating online with the "Live Positively, America's Favorite Park Program" being coordinated by Coca-Cola. The "America is Your Park" program was launched today and encourages everyone to vote for a favorite park and then out and recreate.

In anticipation of today's launch, Reneé Bahl, Executive Director for Arizona's State Parks said, "We would like the public to follow our lead and consolidate their votes so Arizona State Parks can win. We polled our rangers to get a consensus on one park so we have a better chance to win this amazing prize for the whole system," said Bahl. "Some states have a higher population, some higher visitation, but we believe Arizonans have the greatest passion for all their parks and the outdoors so they will join us in voting for Kartchner Caverns State Park."

The staff decided that Kartchner Caverns epitomizes the natural resource stewardship and commitment of Arizonans. Kartchner is now one of the top ten show caves in the world for the diversity of its stunning calcite formations and symbolizes the extraordinary efforts taken by elected officials, park rangers and the public who took unprecedented steps to protect and open this pristine cavern system in 1999. "This living cave has character and a persona. If you haven't gotten a cave kiss from Kartchner Caverns, you haven't lived," says park director Bahl. To watch a cave video tour and learn the amazing secret story of how this cave was saved go to http://azstateparks.com/Parks/KACA/index.html

While we want you to vote as many times as possible for Kartchner Caverns, it is more important that you also visit your favorite park.

Votes will be tallied on August 31, 2010 so hurry! Go to www.livepositively.com/#/Americasparks/vote and vote for Kartchner Caverns State Park.

The National Association of State Park Directors (NASPD) established the America's State Parks alliance (www.americasstateparks.com) to mobilize and educate the public and policy makers on the positive impact state parks have on public health and local economies. The Alliance is launching many national fund-raising initiatives to support America's parks. Americans demonstrated a strong demand for budget-friendly outdoor recreation and cultural tourism, with more than 725 million visits to state parks in 2009.

The Arizona State Parks department operates 23 State Parks and historic sites in Arizona and hosts 2.3 million visitors. These visitors then generate $266 million for the economies and jobs in rural communities in Arizona. For more information about Arizona's State Parks visit AZStateParks.com, connect to our AZStateParks FaceBook & Twitter sites or call (602) 542-4174.


CELEBRATE YOUR SUMMER BY VISITING YOUR 23 STATE PARKS
1400 Campsites, Historic Sites, Exquisite Natural Areas

(Phoenix, AZ -June 29, 2010) - This looks like another long, hot summer for the desert valleys, but in rural Arizona the State Parks offer cool places to camp, hike, fish and spend lazy days in a hammock. A $75 Day-Use Annual Pass will allow visitors and their families to travel from park to park for activities such as picnics, swimming, hiking, and fishing. Some examples of short-trip day use parks are Red Rock/Slide Rock in Sedona, Tonto Natural Bridge in Payson, Boyce Thompson Arboretum in Superior, Riordan Mansion in Flagstaff, Tubac Presidio, Tombstone Courthouse, Yuma Territorial Prison and Yuma Quartermaster Depot. The world renowned Kartchner Caverns State Park has a campground and cave tours available, but call (520) 586-2283 in advance to make reservations.

If you are going camping, there are fire restrictions in almost every location in the state, so be sure to check AZfireinfo.com before you leave urban areas to go camping. Before you leave, visit AZStateParks.com to get driving directions, download park maps and Junior Ranger activity papers. Here are the campgrounds to visit:

Northern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds - Please call ahead.

Dead Horse Ranch State Park - (928) 634-5283 - Cottonwood - 150 campsites - fishing, boating (non-motorized), cabins, hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, guided trail rides, campfires in designated fire rings.

Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area - (928) 537-3680 - 92 hookup sites, 31 campsites, great fishing and swimming. Fire restrictions.

Lyman Lake State Park - (928) 337-4441 - 61 campsites, 4 yurts, 4 cabins, fishing, waterskiing. Campfires in cement fire rings/smoking in vehicles. No smoking while hiking.

Southern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds - Please call ahead.

Catalina State Park (520) 628-5798 - 125 campsites, hiking, corrals for horses. Charcoal and propane fires only, wood campfires not allowed.

Kartchner Caverns State Park (520) 586-2283 - 60 campsites - cave tours. Propane only. Smoking in camp area or vehicle, no smoking while hiking.

Lost Dutchman State Park (480) 982-4485 -Campsites closed after July 5 for repair. Charcoal and propane fires only, wood campfires not allowed, no smoking while hiking.

Patagonia Lake State Park (520) 287-6965 - 107 campsites, boats to rent, fishing, beach. Campfires ok in designated grills, must provide own firewood, no gathering or cutting on park property. Smoking in camp areas only, no smoking while hiking.

Picacho Peak State Park (520) 466-3183 - 85 campsites - fantastic walking trails. No restrictions at this time, no smoking while hiking.

Roper Lake State Park (928) 428-6760 - 71 campsites - outdoor rock hot tub, fishing. Campfires and smoking restricted to developed areas only, no smoking while hiking.

Western Arizona State Parks Campgrounds - Please Call Ahead.

Alamo Lake State Park (928) 669-2088 - 250 campsites, excellent bass fishing, waterskiing, swimming. Campfires and smoking in designed areas only.

Buckskin Mountain State Park & River Island (928) 667-3231 - 126 campsites, water sports, cabanas, beach. Fires in grills, no smoking while hiking.

Cattail Cove State Park (928) 855-1223 - 61 campsites. No wood fires, charcoal for cooking within a campsite or on a grill on the beach. Smoking - campsites and beach only.

Lake Havasu State Park (928) 855-2784 - 47 campsites - boat launches, great park areas and swimming beach. Campfires in fire-rings call for details, smoking in camp areas, no smoking while hiking.



This Year Watch Fireworks in Cooler Country at Lyman Lake State Park

With the valley heating up each day as we approach the holidays, this is the year to go way north to camp and celebrate Independence Day in cooler climes at Lyman Lake State Park.

On Saturday, July 3, the State Park and the St. Johns Chamber will host a charity rubber duck race followed by celebatory fireworks. Enjoy the show over the lake with loud booms echoing against canyon walls and lights flashing and reflecting off the lake. Rubber duck races begin around 5 p.m. and the evening's fireworks will start at dark. (Approx. 8:30 p.m.) The fee for the day is $7 per vehicle (up to 6 people) and $1 for each additional person.

Summer days at Lyman Lake State Park are perfect for fishing, water skiing, camping and hiking. There are many other trout fishing lakes in the area as well. The park features 61 camping sites with shade ramadas, picnic tables and grills. There are also four air conditioned camping cabins ($50) and four (16-feet round) yurts ($35) which are booked most weekends throughout the summer, but usually available on weekdays.

If you are driving an RV, thirty-eight sites have electric hook-ups with no reservations required, 14 of which have sewer connections. There are also many primitive camping sites along the lake and the park almost always has room somewhere for campers during weekends in the summer. There are also large restrooms and hot showers which are perfect after a day of playing on the sandy beach.

For more information about this year's festivities, call Lyman Lake State Park at (928) 337-4441. Lyman Lake State Park is located 11 miles south of St. Johns Arizona on US 191. For more information about the 23 State Parks that are open (2 Natural Areas passively managed and 5 parks closed) statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Documentary airs plight of Arizona's state park system

Citizens urged to contact legislators and Governor to adequately fund parks

The documentary film, Postcards from the Parks will be shown on the following dates:
Thursday, June 17th at 7:30PM (doors open at 7PM), Orpheum Theater, 15 W Aspen Avenue in Flagstaff (928) 556-1580;

Thursday, July 8th at 7:30PM (doors open at 7pm), Madcap Theaters, 730 S Mill Avenue in Tempe (480) 634-5192; and

Thursday, July 22nd at 7:30PM (doors open at 7pm), Grand Cinemas Crossroads 6, 4811 E Grant ( NE corner of Grant & Swan) in Tucson (520) 327-7067.

After the showing of the film, a community dialogue led by filmmaker Sam Jansen, Arizona Humanities Council Scholar Vincent Murray, and other parks advocates will follow.

Postcards from the Parks was produced by four friends — Susan and Peter Culp, Jocelyn Gibbon and Sam Jansen — to chronicle their experiences visiting Arizona's 27 state parks. "In 2009, I was appointed to the Governor's Sustainable State Parks Task Force," explains Susan Culp, "and when we began our work, I was surprised to realize how few state parks I had visited. I wanted to see them all before making any recommendations that could affect their future."

What they found — a system in crisis — inspired the four to share the story of Arizona's state parks with a broader audience. Over the course of six months, the friends documented the parks' natural landscapes, recreational amenities, and historical and cultural sites as well as the visible signs of long decades of neglect. "To be honest, when we started I didn't know whether each and every state park would strike me as impressive and important," Jocelyn Gibbon shares. "But each one was really special — and the system as a whole is such a valuable asset for Arizona."

Through interviews with state leaders, conservation advocates, and parks volunteers as well as relevant research and analysis, Postcards from the Parks highlights the many contributions of the state parks as protectors and preservers of what it means to be an Arizonan. "We hope the movie will be used to generate community action in support of the parks," says Sam Jansen, adding that the producers have created postcards to accompany the film. "The hope was that groups could get together, watch the movie, write postcards to state leaders, and then encourage others to do the same."

After the film's viewing at these three venues on June 17th in Flagstaff, July 8th in Tempe, and July 22nd in Tucson, a facilitated discussion and question and answer period will be led by Vincent Murray, a historian with Arizona Historical Research, in cooperation with the filmmakers and other parks advocates. A native Arizonan, Murray spends much of his spare time as a cultural resource advocate, promoting the preservation of the state's archives, historic buildings, and archaeological sites.

An opportunity for postcard-writing to state leaders will also ensue.

Funding for these events was provided by donations from the Arizona Heritage Alliance, Wells Fargo Bank and the producers of the film. Each film event is free to the public. Donations to the non-profit, the Arizona Heritage Alliance will be accepted.

For more information, contact the Arizona Heritage Alliance at mail@azheritage.org , (602) 528-7500.

Help Protect, Preserve and Enhance the Arizona Heritage Fund.

Join the . Go to Arizona Heritage Alliance and click on the "membership info" link.



June 1, 2010 - Phoenix, AZ

The Arizona State Parks Board Announces Designation of 42 New Trails into the State Trails System Trails

The Arizona State Parks Board recently designated 42 trails from across Arizona as newly recognized State Trails System trails, adding more than 101 miles of trails to the State Trails System. Nominations for the State Trails System for next year are due July 1, 2010.

"In every corner of Arizona, the State Trails System helps connect Arizona families with the wonders of the outdoors," said Annie McVay, Resource Planner for Arizona State Parks. "These new State Trails System trails, built through partnerships with local communities, stakeholders and agencies will create new opportunities for fitness and stewardship, while creating a lasting legacy for our children and grandchildren."

The Arizona State Trails System was established in the 1970's to recognize and promote non-motorized trails that are of special interest or significance to both Arizona's residents and visitors. Trails offer a wide variety of recreation opportunities from numerous federal, state agencies along with local municipalities, tribal lands and land trusts. The System currently contains over 750 trails and is nearing a total of 4,000 miles.

For a list of all trails in the State Trails System and to learn more about the State Trails Program visit http://azstateparks.com/trails/index.html.

For 2009, the Arizona State Parks Board designated the following 42 trails into the State Trails System:

Trail Name Mileage Trail Manager

Legends of Superior Trail 6 Town of Superior

Black Canyon Heritage Park Interpretive Trail 2 Black Canyon City Community Association

Garden Canyon Linear Park Trail 4 City of Sierra Vista

Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail 10.25 Anza Trail Coalition

Estrella Mountain Regional Park, consisting of
Coldwater Trail 2.9 Maricopa County

Gila Trail 0.04 Maricopa County

Pederson Trail 8.7 Maricopa County

Baseline Trail 2.3 Maricopa County

Toothaker Trail 3.7 Maricopa County
Usery Mountain Regional Park, consisting of
Moon Rock Trail 1.4 Maricopa County

Spillway Trail 1.2 Maricopa County

Ruidoso Trail 1.3 Maricopa County

County Line Trail 1 Maricopa County

Crimson Wash Trail 1 Maricopa County

Amigos Wash Trail 1.2 Maricopa County

Levee Trail 1.6 Maricopa County

Cat's Peak Trail 3.1 Maricopa County
McDowell Mountain Regional Park, consisting of
Dixie Mine Trail 5.6 Maricopa County

Granite Trail 3.5 Maricopa County

North Trail 2.9 Maricopa County

Scenic Trail 3.5 Maricopa County

Bluff Trail 2.2 Maricopa County

Nursery Tank Trail 0.3 Maricopa County

Tonto Tank Trail 2.7 Maricopa County

San Tan Mountain Park, consisting of
Littleleaf Trail 0.7 Maricopa County

Hedgehog Trail 0.9 Maricopa County

Stargazer Trail 0.8 Maricopa County

Malpais Trail 4.2 Maricopa County
White Tanks Regional Park, consisting of
Bajada Trail 1 Maricopa County
Cave Creek Regional Park, consisting of
Flume Trail 2.3 Maricopa County

Slate Trail 1.6 Maricopa County
Spur Cross Regional Park, consisting of
Metate Trail 0.8 Maricopa County

Dragonfly Trail 1.9 Maricopa County

Elephant Mountain Trail 2.1 Maricopa County

Tortuga Trail 1.2 Maricopa County
Williams Valley Trails System, consisting of
Valley Bike Trail 2.8 Apache-Sitegreaves National Forest (NF)

Isolation Trail 2.3 Apache-Sitegreaves NF

Half Moon Trail 3.6 Apache-Sitegreaves NF

Yahoo Trail 0.1 Apache-Sitegreaves NF

Lookout Meadow Loop 1.3 Apache-Sitegreaves NF

High Road Trail 0.4 Apache-Sitegreaves NF

Sidewinder Trail 0.9 Apache-Sitegreaves NF

The State Trails System Vision Statement: Arizona's State Trails System is invaluable resource, offering a diversity of quality nonmotorized trails that inspire people to experience the State's magnificent outdoor environment and cultural history.

Please call ahead to find out the latest information about the State Parks by calling (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - June 2, 2010

Documentary Airs Plight Of Arizona's State Park System
Citizens Urged To Contact Legislators And Governor To Adequately Fund Parks

The documentary film, Postcards from the Parks will be shown on:

Thursday, June 17th at 7:30PM (doors open at 7PM), Orpheum Theater, 15 W Aspen Avenue in Flagstaff (928) 556-1580

Thursday, July 8th at 7:30PM (doors open at 7pm), Madcap Theaters, 730 S Mill Avenue in Tempe (480) 634-5192

Coming Soon (date to be announced), Grand Cinemas Crossroads 6, 4811 E Grant (SE corner of Grant & Swan) in Tucson (520) 327-7067.

After the showing of the film, a community dialogue led by Arizona Humanities Council Scholar, Vincent Murray, will follow.

The film is the creation of four friends -- Susan and Peter Culp, Jocelyn Gibbon and Sam Jansen -- who undertook a six-month journey in 2009 to visit all of Arizona's state parks; see what they had to offer; and learn what they and all Arizonans could do to sustain them into the future.

"Our odyssey began at a time of crisis in our state parks system," said Susan Culp, a long-time conservation advocate and member of the Governor's Sustainable State Parks Task Force. "A decade of starvation funding crippled the agency's capital budget for maintenance and repairs and additional budget cuts, due to the "Great Recession" of the past two years, have nearly dealt a death blow to our state parks system."

The four filmed and photographed each parks' natural, historical, and cultural amenities. They interviewed leading Arizona citizens, park managers, visitors, and volunteers. They collected reports, studies, and facts about the economic and social benefits of state parks to local communities, regions, and the state as a whole.

"The film was born as a way to spread the word about the dire straits of our state parks, and to encourage other Arizonans who care about history, our natural treasures, and the outdoors to get involved," said Gibbon. "Unfortunately, as the Governor and State Legislature kept demanding additional agency funding cuts over the course of our filming and interviewing, additional edits and interviews needed to be done, pushing back the film's debut."

Postcards From The Parks highlights the diversity of these state treasures and presents their economic and social value through interviews with state leaders, conservation advocates, and park volunteers, as well as relevant research and analysis.

After the film's viewing at these three venues on: June 17th Flagstaff; July 8th Tempe; TBA in Tucson, a facilitated discussion and question and answer period will be led by Vincent Murray, a historian with Arizona Historical Research. A native Arizonan, Murray spends much of his spare time as a cultural resource advocate, promoting the preservation of the state's archives, historic buildings, and archaeological sites.

Funding for these events was provided by donations from the Arizona Heritage Alliance, Wells Fargo Bank and the producers of the film. Each film event is free to the public; donations to the non-profit, the Arizona Heritage Alliance, will be accepted.

For more information, contact:
Arizona Heritage Alliance
602/528-7500.

Help Protect, Preserve and Enhance the Arizona Heritage Fund.
Join the Arizona Heritage Alliance.



Flagstaff, AZ - May 2010

Arizona Governor recognizes 10 for Preserving State's Heritage
Preservation advocate, Jim McPherson, receives Grand Award

The recipients of the 28th Annual Governor's Heritage Preservation Honors Awards were recognized in front of 250 attendees at the 8th Annual Arizona Statewide Historic Preservation Partnership Conference at the du Bois Center on the campus of Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff.

Presenting the awards on behalf of Arizona Governor Jan Brewer were Renée Bahl, Arizona State Parks Executive Director; James Garrison, Arizona State Historic Preservation Officer; and Lisa Henderson, Arizona Preservation Foundation Board President.

The 2010 honorees are:
- First Pinal County Courthouse Preservation Project, Florence (1878)

- United Verde Mine Project, Jerome (c. 1883)

- Knights of Pythias Building Rehabilitation, Prescott (c. 1892)

- Florence Union High School, Florence (1916)

- Cutler Plotkin Jewish Center Restoration, Phoenix (1921, 1936)

- A.E. England Motor Car Company Building Rehabilitation, Phoenix (1926)

- Arizona Hardware Supply Company Warehouse Rehabilitation, Phoenix (1930)

- Daughters of the American Revolution (Governor George W.P. Hunt Chapter, Gilbert) for efforts to restore Gov. Hunt's Tomb (1932)

- Pima County Historic Preservation Bond Program, Tucson (1997, 2004)

- Jim McPherson, Preservation Advocate, Phoenix

In addition, McPherson was selected from the ten to receive the Grand Award. He serves on the boards of the Arizona Preservation Foundation, Arizona Heritage Alliance, Coordinating Committee for History in Arizona, and Downtown Voices Coalition. He was instrumental in efforts to save the Sun Mercantile Building, A.E. England Building, and "mushroom" bank and adjacent park at 44th Street and Camelback Road in Phoenix. He led the public relations and fund-raising campaign to gain voter support for the 2006 City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Bond Program. This past legislative session, he coordinated the successful statewide citizen effort to defeat Senate Bill 1166, which would have raised property taxes for over 6,000 historic home owners and weakened an important neighborhood revitalization tool.

Since 1982, the Arizona Preservation Foundation and Arizona State Historic Preservation Office (a division of Arizona State Parks) have partnered to present the Governor's Heritage Preservation Awards. These awards recognize people, organizations, and projects that represent outstanding achievements in preserving Arizona's historic resources.

The ten award winners are introduced and the Grand Award winner is announced at the annual Arizona Statewide Historic Preservation Conference awards luncheon.

Sponsors of the 2010 conference: Archaeological Consulting Services, Arizona Archaeological Council, Arizona Department of Commerce, Arizona Historical Society, Arizona Lottery, Arizona Main Street Program, Arizona Preservation Foundation, Arizona State Parks, Center for Desert Archaeology, City of Flagstaff, Desert Archaeology, Flagstaff Convention & Visitors Bureau, Greenstreet Development, Historic Streetscapes, Kimley-Horn & Associates, Local First Arizona, Logan Simpson Design, National Park Service, National Trust for Historic Preservation, NCS Inc., Poster Frost Mirto, Statistical Research, SWCA Environmental Consultants, and Veer Consulting.

About Arizona State Historic Preservation Office

The Arizona State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), a division of Arizona State Parks, assists private citizens, private institutions, local governments, tribes, and state and federal agencies in the identification, evaluation, protection, and enhancement of historic and archaeological properties that have significance for local communities, the State of Arizona, or the Nation. The role and function of the SHPO is defined in both state law (Arizona Historic Preservation Act) and federal law (National Historic Preservation Act, as amended).

About Arizona Preservation Foundation The Arizona Preservation Foundation is Arizona's only non-profit statewide historic preservation organization. Founded in 1979, the Foundation is dedicated to preserving Arizona's historical, archaeological, architectural, and cultural resources. For more information see: www.azpreservation.org



Phoenix, AZ - May 27, 2010

Thirteen Arizona State Parks Campgrounds OPEN and Ten Historic/Environmental State Parks OPEN

Thanks to the extraordinary efforts of rural communities, thirteen of Arizona's State "camping" Parks in Arizona will be OPEN this summer and will provide many opportunities for Memorial Day 2010 campers. Ten historic and environmental parks will also be open. State Parks such as Lyman Lake near Springerville, Roper Lake in Safford and Alamo Lake State Park will probably have campgrounds that will not fill to capacity.

Day use parks such as Red Rock and Slide Rock in Sedona, Tonto Natural Bridge in Payson, Boyce Thompson Arboretum in Globe, Riordan Mansion in Flagstaff, Tubac Presidio, Tombstone (Wyatt Earp Days), Yuma Prison and Yuma Crossing will all be open for daytrippers looking for places to explore. Kartchner Caverns State Park will have some cave tours available, but you should always call in advance. (Only 5 State Parks are now closed.)

There are some fire restrictions around the State, so if you are planning to build a campfire anywhere, be sure to check for fire restrictions at AZfireinfo.com. Remember if you cause a fire under fire restrictions it may result in substantial fines and jail time. To keep your family and public lands safe while camping please follow these precautionary tips:

-Bring a propane stove for cooking/heating rather than using a campfire.

-Carry a shovel in your car and use dirt and FIVE gallons of water for putting out campfires.
-Always make tiny campfires that can be quickly extinguished.

-Only smoke in vehicles or designed campsites and never while hiking.

Northern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds - Call ahead.

* Dead Horse Ranch State Park - (928) 634-5283 - Cottonwood - 150 campsites - fishing, boating (non-motorized), hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, guided trail rides, campfires in designated fire rings.

* Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area - (928) 537-3680 - 92 hookup sites, 31 campsites, great fishing and swimming. Fire restrictions during windy days. Call ahead regarding campfires.

* Lyman Lake State Park - (928) 337-4441 - 61 campsites & 4 yurts / 4 cabins, fishing, waterskiing . Campfires in cement fire rings and smoking in vehicles. No smoking while hiking.

Southern Arizona State Parks Campgrounds - Call ahead.

* Catalina State Park (520) 628-5798 - 125 campsites, hiking, corrals for horses. Charcoal and propane fires only, wood campfires not allowed.

* Kartchner Caverns State Park (520) 586-2283 - 60 campsites - cave tours. Propane only. Smoking in camp area or vehicle, no smoking while hiking.

* Lost Dutchman State Park (480) 982-4485 - 70 campsites, hiking into Superstitions. Charcoal and propane fires only, wood campfires not allowed, no smoking while hiking.

* Patagonia Lake State Park (520) 287-6965 - 107 campsites, boats to rent, fishing, beach. Campfires ok in designated grills, must provide own firewood, no gathering or cutting on park property. Smoking in camp areas only, no smoking while hiking.

* Picacho Peak State Park (520) 466-3183 - 85 campsites - fantastic walking trails. No restrictions at this time, no smoking while hiking.

* Roper Lake State Park (928) 428-6760 - 71 campsites - hot tub, fishing. Campfires and smoking restricted to developed areas only, no smoking while hiking.

Western Arizona State Parks Campgrounds - Call Ahead.

* Alamo Lake State Park (928) 669-2088 - 250 campsites, excellent bass fishing, waterskiing, swimming. Campfires and smoking in designed areas only.

* Buckskin Mountain State Park & River Island (928) 667-3231 - 126 campsites, water sports, cabanas, beach. Campfires in designated grills, no smoking while hiking.

* Cattail Cove State Park (928) 855-1223 - 61 campsites. No wood fires, charcoal for cooking within a campsite or on a grill on the beach. Smoking - campsites and beach only.

* Lake Havasu State Park (928) 855-2784 - 47 campsites - boat launches, great park areas and swimming beach. Campfires in fire-rings call for details, smoking in camp areas, no smoking while hiking.

For more information about the 23 State Parks that are open (2 Natural Areas passively managed and 5 parks closed) statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - May 19, 2010

Arizona's Rural Communities Rescue State Parks from Closures
Good News! 23 Arizona State Parks will Stay Open

The Arizona State Parks Board voted today to keep five more State Parks from closing on June 3 by directing Executive Director Renee Bahl to sign unique management and financial agreements with rural communities to keep each one open.

"The State Parks Board, a volunteer group of seven members, has voted in the last three months to negotiate with counties, cities and parks friends groups to fund a total of 23 State Parks to be open into the next fiscal year. The real key now is that we need every Arizonan to use their State Parks as often as possible," said Bahl. "We want the public to know that the Board and staff are focusing on keeping State Parks open because the fiscal impact and loss of jobs from closed parks would be devastating to these rural towns and we believe every Arizonan deserves a robust State Park system."

According to Parks Board Chairman, Reese Woodling, "We have been successful in finding solutions to keep State Parks open, but these are only short term measures. It is a miracle that these communities have raised the funds to keep these parks open so far this year. Arizonans should be proud that so many concerned individuals have stepped forward to lead the communities to cobble together these monies."

"Unfortunately we have lost $10 million dollars from the Heritage Fund to support State, County and City parks and our operating budget has dropped significantly. In two years, the total amount of sweeps and diversions from twelve fund sources that benefit Arizona conservation projects has been $71 million."

Here are some of the highlights of the community efforts: Bashas' Family of Stores (130) raised $20,000, Dasani Water raised $5,000 for recycling programs, Apache Junction businesses raised $26,000 (Lost Dutchman), Tubac Historical Society raised $35,000 (Tubac Presidio), Friends of Tonto raised $8,000 (Tonto Nat. Bridge), Wickenburg/Salome raised $30,000 (Alamo), Riordan Action Alliance raised $40,000 (Riordan Mansion), the City of Eloy has raised $20,000 (Picacho Peak), Benefactors of Red Rock State Park have raised $60,000, Friends of Oracle State Park have raised $50,000 and Yuma raised $70,000 (Territorial Prison). The Arizona Game and Fish Department helped Graham County rescue Roper Lake State Park and Apache County will keep Lyman Lake open this summer. Arizona Highways Magazine has already sold more than 100 magazine subscriptions to support State Parks and the increased tourism these subscriptions will generate will help increase park revenues.

Please call ahead to find out the latest information about the State Parks by calling (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - May 15, 2010

State parks (SB 1349). Allows the state Parks Board to contract with outside entities - public or private - to operate a state park for up to one year.



Phoenix, AZ - April 21, 2010

Arizona State Parks Board Meeting Wednesday

The Arizona State Parks Board will meet on Wednesday, April 21, 2010 starting at 10am at the Arizona State Parks main headquarters (basement) at 1300 West Washington, Phoenix, AZ 85013. The meeting is open to the public and the Agenda/Board recommendations are posted at http://azstateparks.com/board.

After the meeting, the public will be able to access the video stream on the Arizona State Parks website at www.AZstateparks.com.

The Board will consider adoption of a revised FY 2010 Operating Budget, an agreement with Apache County to re-open and keep Lyman Lake State Park open throughout the summer, and an agreement with Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors for them to operate Tubac Presidio State Historic Park.

Please call ahead to find out the latest information about the State Parks by calling (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.

Phoenix, AZ - April 6, 2010

STATE-AGENCIES CREATE UNIQUE PARTNERSHIP TO SURVIVE STATE'S FUNDING CRISIS

Arizona Highways magazine and Arizona State Parks, two iconic state-owned institutions, have created a unique partnership to support each other and survive the impact of the state's funding crisis. Both self-funded organizations are vital to the state's tourism industry, yet subject to fund sweeps, cuts and closures. Through a very simple subscription drive benefiting State Parks statewide, Arizona Highways magazine hopes to help keep parks open through the pages of its magazine.

Throughout the next year, for every $24 subscription (12 issues) to Arizona Highways magazine, $5 will benefit Arizona State Parks via the State Parks Foundation - a non-profit group that advocates for the entire Arizona State Park system. At the time of subscribing, people can choose which park their $5 will support.

The magazine's stunning photography of landscapes along with the compelling natural and historical stories draw people to Arizona, and the agencies are challenging every Arizonan to assist in this quest. The goal is to encourage Arizona residents and businesses to subscribe to the magazine and to use subscriptions as gifts for employees and family members who live in other states and countries.

Numerous communities are putting forward tremendous grass-root efforts to save their respective parks, at least temporarily, but we need thousands of new visitors to come to these communities," said Renee Bahl, executive director of Arizona State Parks. "We really like the idea that everyone can get involved by sending the magazine to families and in addition there will be five dollars generated directly to help the park they enjoy.

A significant benefit of this program is that the funds are not subject to reduction or redirection by the state legislature because the money goes directly to the Arizona State Parks Foundation, said Win Holden, publisher of Arizona Highways magazine. So you can be confident that every dollar will go to support our State Parks.

"Like Arizona Highways magazine, State Parks shares our mission of promoting tourism and travel throughout the state," said Holden. "Together we generate millions of dollars in revenue for our state through tourism spending. It makes sense that we work together to keep our organizations thriving positively supporting Arizona's economy.

To subscribe and support State Parks, visit www.arizonahighways.com or www.azstateparks.com and click on the "Save our Parks" icon. Be sure to use the special promotion code you'll find on the Web site. Each year you renew your subscription, $5 will go toward State Parks, as well. If you are a current subscriber, the term of your subscription will be extended by one year and when you pay for that extension, a $5 contribution will be made to the Arizona State Parks Foundation. The same is true for any gift subscription sent to anyone, anywhere in the world.

About Arizona Highways

Arizona Highways magazine's award-winning photography, travel journalism and its steadfast commitment to discovering the state's treasures has brought the beauty and splendor of Arizona to visitors and natives alike for more than 80 years. Helping to drive tourism to and through the state, Arizona Highways has subscribers in all 50 states and more than 120 countries. It also has a publishing imprint, Arizona Highways Books, and physical and online retail stores. Newsstand price for Arizona Highways is $3.99 US / $4.99 Canada. Subscriptions are $24 per year. The magazine now is available in digital format at http://www.arizonahighways.com/digital.html . For more information, visit Arizona Highways .



Phoenix, AZ - April 11, 2010

History of the Soldier Fort Verde State Historic Park

Did you ever wonder what this part of the southwest was like when it was called the "Territory of Arizona." The Territory existed from February 24, 1863 until February 14, 1912, when it was admitted to the Union as the 48th state. During this period there were as much as 17 forts managed by the U.S. government and the troops protected settlers, built roads and explored. At that time, one-fifth of the U.S. military was stationed in Arizona, which grew the population because it helped the civilians get contracts to provide these troops with supplies and food.

Want to learn more about Arizona's military history? Don't miss "History of the Soldier" at Fort Verde State Park which offers visitors a living history timeline of military and civilian encampments from the Revolutionary War to the present day. Activities will include flag raising ceremonies, military demonstrations throughout the day, a fashion show, games for children. Veterans from around the state are encouraged to attend this special event and come to Camp Verde for picnics and special gatherings at Fort Verde State Historic Park.

History of the Soldier will be held on Saturday, April 10th from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Sunday, April 11th from 9:00-2:00 pm. For more information about this event contact the park at (928) 567-3275. The park entrance fee is $4 per person for those aged 14 and up and $2 for children aged 7 to 13; 6 and under are free.

Arizona State Parks offers 50% off regular day-use entrance for active military, Reserve, National Guard and State Militia troops. There is a free annual pass offered for 100% disabled veterans who live in Arizona. For information about the Disabled Veterans pass call (602) 542-4174 or visit azstateparks.com.

Fort Verde State Historic Park is located in downtown Camp Verde, Arizona. From Phoenix: I-17 to Exit 287; turn right onto Hwy 260 (east). Turn left on Finnie Flat Rd, left on Hollamon St. for one block, park entry is on the right side of the street.

The Arizona State Parks department, in partnership with the City of Camp Verde, will present many new events this year at Fort Verde State Historic Park. For information about Arizona State Parks call (602) 542-4174 or (800) 285-3703 outside of the Phoenix metro area or visit the website at Arizona State Parks .



Phoenix, AZ - April 11, 2010

Sorry, the State of Arizona is CLOSED
by Roger Emery

It will be important for the "affected" businesses, communities and Arizona residents to start working together to take back the "peoples' assets" now being mismanaged by government at every level. We can do without most of the government we are paying for, but we cannot do without the citizens who make all things possible.
Roger Emery

PROBLEM

Director Ken Travous would create many ancillary problems by the closing the Arizona State parks that belong to the people, i.e., not government bureaucrats.

We are already hearing that by taking away the things that most please taxpayers or offer them some payback for their hard earned tax dollars government bureaucrats can scare their constituent dupes into paying more taxes. That was in the past - before the so-called Trillion dollar bailout of banks.

Just as the idiotic closure of many State of Arizona Rest Stops leads to hardship and potential fatalities, let alone telling any tourists that: The State of Arizona is Closed, the closure of Arizona State Parks is a stick in the eye to local communities, business serving these areas and the true owners of these parks, the citizens of Arizona and America.

Now we are hearing that the great concern of these same muddled-headed bureaucrats is how they are going to cover the cost of protecting the parks from untoward citizens. Let me clarify this, please. So, by closing the Arizona State Parks, the state is going to save money, right?

Of course not having thought through this knee-jerk reaction, the Director and his minions forgot that by closing these parks they are going to kill off small businesses that provide the services and goods for park campers and day users. Thus, the state collects even less money in taxes these businesses would contribute to pay the salaries and health plans and pensions for the Parks Department and Director Travous as he relates to us that, "It's a grim, grim time."

By closing the State Parks tourists and locals alike will not be traveling the highways and visiting business along the way: restaurants, travel center service stations, retail outdoor/camping/fishing retailers, craft, souvenir and novelty shops, RV and Camping grounds, and many other ancillary businesses.

By putting out the sign: Sorry, the State of Arizona is CLOSED, government is proving that is incapable of thinking through the manner in which a free society properly works.

Note to government: the people cannot serve you, if you cannot serve us with all of the, apparently misspent, taxes that each of us pay.

SOLUTION

This is normally a "grim" decision when made by government.

But, when common sense provided by a constituent will solve the problem and allow the State of Arizona to say: We are Open for business - will they listen?

There is no reason for government to believe only they can manage the citizen's assets. Instead, government should move the people most affected by their decisions to the front of the solution process: the people and businesses whose taxes make the parks possible in the first place.

The Parks should be left open to allow a consortium of local area businesses and involved citizens to help monitor the parks and provide trash removal services and restroom maintenance. Most of the cost of installing video cameras and automated park entry tickets for security could be mitigated by using current budget decreases in furloughing state park employees.

In an age of web cameras and 24/7 internet information sharing, we must and reduce government labor costs by replacing costly government jobs with efficient and effective technology. This is a given in private industry. It is time for government to quit feather-bedding huge labor costs upon it citizens.

Whether it be closed Rest Stops, State Parks, a building or a house, once they are vacant they deteriorate at a much faster pace than if utilized, enjoyed and maintained. This is the common sense approach we must have by Director Travous and all other Arizona government decision-makers. If government cannot prove its worth, then it is time to replace it. We have the means and methods and willing citizens to solve our state's problems shed of the Chicken Little mentality that currently prevails in most government decision-makers' minds.

If the sky is to fall, it must be on the heads of those with no solutions or punitive solutions. The rest of us know how to move forward and make the world, society and our communities work, if we can only get the government Luddites to fade into history, quickly.

Roger S. Emery
Corporate Adventures;
OSCS, LLC
www.progreet.net
roger@progreet.net
2509 N. Campbell Avenue, #100
Tucson, AZ 85719
PH: (520) 325-4114; (800) 875-4114
Fax: (520) 325-4465
Cell: (520) 465-5204



Phoenix, AZ - April 2, 2010

Sedona's Red Rock State Park Presents A Day in the Park on April 17
Celebrate Spring - And Support the park.

The Red Rock State Park Benefactors will be celebrating spring weather by hosting "A Day in the Park" on April 17. The Benefactors encourage the public to come and support Red Rock State Park.

Some of the programs throughout the day will be led by volunteer naturalists and include: Geology interpretation with Chris Weld, "Who's Scat is That and Tracks?' with Van VanDenburgh, "Birding" with Wayne Johnson, and "Trees Are Home" with Joanne Reed, Other Ambassador Interpreters and naturalists include Gary Drake, Charlotte Gourley, Dixon Gourley, Bob Dick, and Brenda Robinson.

SCHEDULED PROGRAMS
10:00 Nature Hike with Volunteer Naturalist Gary Drake who is also a volunteer at the Sedona Chamber of Commerce
10:30 Geology Hike with Volunteer Naturalist Jack Conklin
11:00 RRSP Birding Program with Volunteer Naturalist John Moore who is also a Montezuma Castle National Monument Volunteer
11:30 House of Apache Fires Hike with Volunteer Naturalist Pat Mastoris
12:00 Owls, a presentation by Volunteer Naturalist Andy Berry
12:30 RRSP Homesteads and History with Volunteer Naturalist Bob Moore who is also a Docent at the Sedona Heritage Museum
12:45 Archeology Hike-Rock Art & the Sinagua with Volunteer Naturalist Brenda Robinson who is also a Docent Museum of Northern Arizona
1:30 Bats of the Verde Valley-Janie Agyagos, Wildlife Biologist, USFS, Red Rock Ranger District
2:30 Botany Hike with Volunteer Naturalist Phyllis Lindberg who is also a coordinator of the Red Rock Ranger District Spring Wildflower Display
3:00 Oak Creek - The Verde River in Disguise with Dan Campbell, Nature Conservancy, Manager Verde River Program, Presided over the passage of the Arizona Heritage Fund, co-produced the Desert Speaks

**All Hikes meet in front of the Visitor Center

For more information or reservations call (928) 282-6907. Red Rock State Park is located at 4050 Lower Red Rock Loop in Sedona.

Red Rock State Park will be open 7 days a week. Park hours are 8 AM to 5 PM. Visitor Center hours are 9 AM to 5 PM.

Park Entrance Fee is $10.00 per vehicle for up to 4 adults, each additional adult is charged $3 each. (There is no charge for children). A $3 per person entrance fee applies to pedestrians, equestrians and bicyclists. Arizona State Parks Annual Pass is available for $75 (some restrictions apply).

For more information about the many State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - March 26, 2010)

FORT VERDE STATE HISTORIC PARK GRANTED REPRIEVE FROM CLOSING ON MARCH 29

(Phoenix, AZ - March 26, 2010) Arizona State Parks and the Town of Camp Verde announced today that Fort Verde State Historic Park will not close as planned on March 29, 2010. Camp Verde Mayor Bob Burnside has agreed to provide funding from the Town of Camp Verde and Yavapai County for State Parks to keep the park open and operating for one year.

"We have signed the Intergovernmental Agreement to keep the park open another year with options for two additional one-year periods," said State Parks Executive Director Reneé Bahl.

According to Mayor Burnside, "We are committed to promoting this park which will bring visitors to Camp Verde even during the economic recession. Fort Verde is the focus of our tourism efforts to draw visitors to the downtown area. We also want to attract as many local volunteers as possible to get involved at the Fort with many new special events and activities. Already there are more than 50 volunteers working with Fort Verde, but we'll need everyone's support if we are going to keep the park open on the usual five-day schedule."

"Our Yavapai County Supervisors have been extremely supportive in partnering with us to keep the park open and we all appreciate the work that Supervisor Chip Davis has done to find funds to help on this effort," said Burnside.

"The Camp Verde Historical Society has been our partner for many years and has supported efforts to keep this State Park operating," said Bahl. "Arizona should appreciate the work this Historical Society has done to win the battle to save Fort Verde. This is the only State Park which offers a glimpse into the history of Arizona's frontier soldier's everyday life in the late 1800's and the best-preserved example of this period in Arizona's military history."



(Phoenix, AZ - March 26, 2010)

Santa Cruz County Will Operate Tubac Presidio State Historic Park

(March 26, 2010- Phoenix, AZ) -- Arizona State Parks and Santa Cruz County announced today that Tubac Presidio State Historic Park will not close as planned on Monday, March 29. Executive Director Renee Bahl and County Manager Greg Lucero have come to an agreement that the County will be able to take over the management of the park.

"We are finalizing the Intergovernmental Agreement to keep the State Park open for at least another year," said Bahl. "Our County Supervisors were extremely supportive of keeping this park operating and they will ratify their commitment to keep Arizona's first State Park open with this Agreement," said Lucero.

"Through this process we have witnessed something truly remarkable. Our County Supervisors, State Parks, and the community of Tubac worked collaboratively to save Arizona's treasure, the place where Arizona started. We have much to celebrate today," said Shaw Kinsley, President of the Tubac Historical Society.

The Park will continue operations on Monday as usual with the five-day 9-5:00 pm schedule. (closed Tues/Wed.) Ultimately the County will be responsible for the operation of the Park and the exhibits that were recently renovated at the Park will not have to be moved. "We expect this to be a seamless transition that will not affect the flow of tourism into the community," said Lucero.

"We are thankful that the Tubac Historical Society has worked so diligently to bring this partnership to fruition," said Bahl. "It is a great day that we can say that the State Park which interprets the Piman community and Spanish colonization of the 1700's will be available for all to see and will continue to draw visitors to the area from around the world."



(Phoenix, AZ - March 25, 2010)

6th Annual "Music in the Park"
Spring Music Concert Series at Oracle State Park

(Oracle, Arizona - March 25, 2010) Oracle State Park is currently closed to the public due to state budget reductions. The volunteer non-profit group, Friends of Oracle State Park, is continuing to support the closed park by funding maintenance projects to preserve and protect the historic Kannally Ranch House. This spring, Oracle State Park gates will open on three days only for a special event fundraiser, presented by Friends of Oracle State Park.

The sixth annual "Music In The Park" returns to Oracle State Park with three concerts scheduled one Sunday a month April through June. The concerts will be held outdoors at the Kannally Ranch House. No reservation is needed. Tickets will be available in advance or the day of the event for $10 per person. The cost includes the entrance fee to Oracle State Park. Annual park passes do not apply for this special event; kids age 13 and younger are free. Each concert begins at a different start time. The park main entrance gate will open one hour before the scheduled start time for each of the three concerts.

On Sunday, April 18, Ismael Barajas returns by popular demand to perform from 3:00pm to 5:00pm. Ismael and his trio play a blend of styles using Salsa, Jazz, Bossa-Nova, Classical, Flamenco, as well as Mexican folk music.

On Sunday, May 16, Kevin Pakulis Band will perform at 5:00pm until 7:00pm. Award winning singer/songwriter, Kevin Pakulis has received well-deserved national and international attention. Described as a cross between Tom Petty & John Cash, Kevin's songs are tight, edgy, and delivered with authority.

On Sunday June 13, Beau Renfro will perform at 7:00pm until 9:00pm. Beau has been recording for Stardust Records for many years now, and his CD's are played on radio worldwide. In September 2009 he was elected into the Indie Country Music Hall of Fame.

For advance sales, series tickets or more information, contact Friends of Oracle State Park at (520) 896-9269. Oracle State Park, Center for Environmental Education, is a 4,000 acre wildlife refuge located in the northern foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains in the town of Oracle north of Tucson. The Mediterranean Revival-Style Kannally Ranch House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The terraced patios offer sweeping views of the Galiuro Mountains and surrounding oak-grasslands.

For information about park closures throughout the state, contact Arizona State Parks at (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit the website at www.AZstateparks.com.



(Phoenix, AZ - March 3, 2010)

Help Save State Parks – Again!
Representative John Kavanagh is blocking action on HCR2040.

HCR2040 Sustainable State Parks Fund (Sponsors: Jones, Brown, Ch. Campbell, et al) passed easily out of the House Natural Resources and Rural Affairs Committee last week, but now must be heard in the House Appropriations Committee OR THE BILL WILL DIE.

Representative John Kavanagh (R-08), who represents much of Scottsdale and Fountain Hills, is Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. He is refusing to hear the bill because he does not like it. Yes, he has the power to destroy the Arizona State Parks and the state agency as we know it!!!

HCR2040 refers to the ballot a measure to allow free day use of all of our State Parks for a fee on every vehicle registration. The funds would be administered by the State Parks Board to operate and maintain parks. With this $12 fee (part of which will go to the Arizona Department of Transportation), Parks can generate approximately $39 million per year. This would provide the necessary dollars for operation and maintenance of our State Parks System including the natural areas, historic parks, and lakes.

Do you live in Representative Kavanagh's district? If so, it's especially important for you to contact him. He is holding up a bill that affects the entire state as well as our state parks system.

Please send a polite message to Representative Kavanagh, email jkavanagh@azleg.gov, or call (602) 926-3002. If you are outside the Phoenix area, call 1-800-352-8404 and ask to be connected to his office.

Please contact Representative Kavanagh and ask him to hear HCR2040 in House Appropriations -- let the full legislature and the voters have a chance to decide the fate of the funding our state parks into the future.

Thank you so much for taking action!

Help Protect, Preserve and Enhance the Arizona Heritage Fund.

Join the Arizona Heritage Alliance. Go to www.azheritage.org and click on the "membership info" link.



(Phoenix, AZ - February 19, 2010)

Off-Highway Vehicle Fund Monies Now Available for Projects

In 2009 the Arizona Legislature authorized a new Off-Highway Vehicle "Sticker Fund" which started collecting fees in January of 2009. This new Off-Highway Vehicle Fund is generated by a $25 fee for an indicia that is attached to the license plates of all-terrain vehicles and other types of smaller off-highway motorized vehicles. This new fund now has accumulated $309,000 for projects.

These monies will help manage recreational activity on Arizona's public lands by motorized vehicles. The Arizona State Parks - OHV Recreation Fund (gas taxes) historically were used to print an OHV map guide, provide riding facilities, OHV education, trail signage, rural maps, mitigation and enforcement on trails.

This new "Sticker Fund" will provide funding for projects that meet the legislative requirements and priorities established in the Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Plan. In the first phase of the program, priority projects will be funded and built to meet the heavy demand of off-highway vehicle users in Arizona. A new feature of this program is that there are no application deadlines. Project applications will be accepted by the State Parks Board and reviewed periodically as funds become available.

The second phase of the grant program, open in the fall, will seek projects involving historical and cultural clearance and compliance near trails. And finally, the fund applications will be available for education projects/programs and long-term funding arrangements with managers of OHV use areas.

State Parks develops the OHV recreation plan every five years with input from land managing agency staff, OHV user organizations, individual OHV users, and the general public. The 2010 State Trails Plan can be found on the State Parks website: http://azstateparks.com/publications/index.html#Trails_2010

Projects will be considered for funding each time the Off-Highway Vehicle Advisory Group meets to review projects unless the project sponsor withdraws the application.

Projects selected for funding in Phase I will encompass all of the following recommendations:

HIGH-USE AREA - the project will be located on a route, trail, or area that is currently experience heavy OHV traffic. USER SUPPORTED - the project will be endorsed by at least one user organization that can be identified with the specific project area.

PRIORITY RECOMMENDATION - the project will include: maintenance and/or renovation of existing routes, trails, or areas; mitigation of damage in proximity to approved use areas; and installation of trail route signs. DIVERSITY - the selected projects will represent a cross section of use types and geographic areas. EXPEDIENCE - the project will be completed June 30, 2011.

SPONSOR ELIGIBILITY - the applicant must have control of and management responsibility for the area of the project and have a current agreement with State Parks in effect to allow transfer of funds for OHV project purposes.

For more information call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - February, 2010)

Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Verde State Historic Park Valentine's Day Weekend

Join the troops of the Tenth Cavalry Association, Buffalo Soldiers, as they provide living history presentations at Fort Verde State Historic Park. The event will take place Saturday, February 13, 2010 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Sunday, February 14, 2010 from 8 a.m. to noon.

Bring your special someone or all of your loved ones to Fort Verde State Historic Park and learn about history with the Buffalo Soldiers, and on Saturday (in conjunction with the Town of Camp Verde's Wine, Pecan and Antique Festival), bring a pecan pie and the best tasting pie will win a gift basket with books and other items from the Fort bookstore. There will also be three-legged and potato sack races in the afternoon.

The Buffalo Soldiers will be dressed in period replica uniforms and equipment issued by the United States Army during the 1870s Indian War period. Members of this troop have appeared in feature films, commercials, historical videos, parades and reenactments.

The first Buffalo Soldiers troop serving at Fort Verde was Troop I, 10th Cavalry of the Buffalo Soldiers. It was organized in 1866 and came to Fort Verde in 1885, following a distinguished record of military service during the Indian Wars of the Western frontier.

The Wine, Pecan and Antique Festival will be held downtown in the community center during Valentine's Day weekend. It will feature wines from the Verde Valley and Arizona, pecan pies and desserts, booths loaded with antiques and collectibles, agricultural demonstrations, a car show, art, vendors, music, a nut contest, and more.

For more information about the activities at Fort Verde State Historic Park call (928) 567-3275. For more information about the Wine, Pecan and Antique Festival contact the Camp Verde Chamber of Commerce at (928) 567-9294. Fort Verde State Historic Park is located in downtown Camp Verde, Arizona. Take I-17 to Hwy 260 (east). Turn left on Main Street to 125 E. Holloman St. and go two blocks down on the right side.

Park Entrance Fee is $3 per person for children and adults aged 14 & up. Youths aged 13 to 17 years of age will be charged $1 per person. There is no charge for children 12 years of age or younger. Arizona State Parks offers a free Annual Pass to disabled veterans living in Arizona for those qualified at 100% disability.

Please call ahead to find out the latest information about the State Parks by calling (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - January 15, 2010)

ARIZONA STATE PARKS KEEPS NINE PARKS OPEN. THIRTEEN WILL CLOSE.

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: Ellen Bilbrey at (602) 228-8518 or (602) 542-1996 or pio(at)azstateparks.gov

The Arizona State Parks Board today voted to keep nine parks open and close the remaining thirteen State Parks in a phased series of closures starting February 22, 2010 due to six different State Parks funds being swept of $8.6 million. In addition, four parks remain closed due to previous budget reductions.

The nine parks that will remain open are ones that generate the most revenue back into the parks operating revolving funds. The parks that will remain open include Buckskin Mountain State Park in Parker, Catalina State Park near Tucson, Cattail Cove State Park in Lake Havasu City, Dead Horse Ranch State Park in Cottonwood, Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area in Show Low, Kartchner Caverns State Park in Benson, Lake Havasu State Park, Patagonia Lake State Park and Slide Rock State Park in Sedona.

The remaining parks will be closed in a phased sequence starting on February 22, 2010 and include Homolovi Ruins State Park in Winslow, Lyman Lake State Park in St. Johns and Riordan Mansion State Historic Park in Flagstaff.

The next park closings will occur on March 29, 2010 and will include Fort Verde State Historic Park in Camp Verde, Roper Lake State Park in Safford, Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park, Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park and Tubac Presidio State Historic Park.

The final phased closings will occur on June 3, 2010 and will include Tonto Natural Bridge State Park near Payson, Alamo Lake State Park in Wenden, Lost Dutchman State Park in Apache Junction, Picacho Peak State Park and Red Rock State Park in Sedona.

The remaining parks will continue their agreements with other entities or will be passively managed by an adjacent park. These include Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park in Superior, Sonoita Creek State Natural Area, Verde River Greenway State Natural Area and Yuma Quartermaster Depot State Historic Park.

Four parks would remain closed. These include Jerome State Historic Park, McFarland State Historic Park in Florence, Oracle State Park, and San Rafael State Natural Area.

For more information about the 27 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free 800-285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ -- Dec. 17, 2009)

SPECIAL SESSION BILL PROPOSES SWEEP OF $9.2 MILLION FROM STATE PARK GATE FEES, DONATIONS & HERITAGE FUNDS

Publishers Note - "xxxxxxxxxsskkkkkkk,,,,g,,,s,,s" The previous represents some of the things I should probably not say about how our elected officials are mishandling the public funds.

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: Ellen Bilbrey at (602) 228-8518 or (602) 542-1996 or pio(at)azstateparks.gov

House Bill 2001 proposes reductions and sweeps of $9.2 million from conservation funds such as the State Parks gate fees, donations, State Lake Improvement Fund and Heritage Funds. The consequence of the sweeps will be the closure of State Parks causing an additional $266 million revenue loss to these rural communities by reducing leisure business generated by the 2.3 million park visitors.

"These sweeps will be catastrophic to the agency and will eliminate any hope of us operating the system or contributing to the economies of these rural communities," said Reese Woodling, the Arizona State Parks Board Chairman. "If this bill passes we would need to reduce staff by approximately 75 of our remaining 218 employees and that step would force park closures. Also, these cuts are based on the Parks being open and earning over $8 million from gate fees which will not happen with Parks closed."

House Bill 2001 is seeking $205 million in state government cuts to begin to address a deficit currently estimated at $1.5 billion. The proposed cuts to State Parks would equate to almost 5% of their solution, while State Parks currently receives less than 1/10 of 1% of the overall state budget. Additionally, State Parks receives NO money from the state General Fund, however the impact of the park system on the state's economy is more than $266 million.

Here are the proposed sweeps from State Parks funds

- $2,302,100 in reductions and sweeps to the Enhancement Fund (gate fees), which is the agency's principle operating budget, will force staff reductions. The resulting loss in revenue will result in a zero balance to begin the next fiscal year (July 2010).

- $1,915,800 in reductions and sweeps to the State Lake Improvement Fund. These cuts would make it impossible to operate the parks along the Colorado River. The Enhancement Fund and SLIF reductions equate to the loss of at least 75 employees, certainly leading to many park closures.

- $3,909,400 in reductions and sweeps to the Arizona Heritage Fund will imperil funding for critical State Parks capital projects (including a water line for fire suppression at Lake Havasu State Park and the extension of Benson water line necessary for the long-term health of Kartchner Caverns), and the grants that have been awarded out to Arizona's communities for historic preservation and city/county parks.
- State Parks Gift Shop revolving fund $131,500
- State Parks Donations Fund $213,900
- Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Fund $610,200
- Partnerships Fund $156,900

For more information contact Arizona State Parks at (602) 542-4174 or visit AZStateParks.com.



(Phoenix, AZ - December 15, 2009)

Sedona's Red Rock State Park Captures the Essence of Arizona through Outdoor Programming
Arizona State Parks Annual Pass

During the month of January 2010, Red Rock State Park will be open from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Thursdays through Mondays and closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The programs for the month are:

Insects Around the World: January 3, 2010
Bill Harding will present a program on "Insects Around the World" at 2:00 PM on Sunday, January 3, 2010, in the theater at Red Rock State Park. A volunteer at Red Rock State Park, Harding is an insect enthusiast whose passion began with a junior high science project. Once hooked on the subject, he never looked back! The program will present an overview of selected specimens. Harding leaves sufficient time to relate short anecdotes about his experiences on his collecting trips and then opens the program to questions from the audience. It is a great opportunity to learn and share information. Reservations are recommended, as seating is limited. Call 282-6907 for additional information or restrictions. Program is free with paid admission to the Park.

Geology Hike: January 10, 2010
On the second Sunday, visitors can join a volunteer on a guided geology hike through Red Rock State Park. You will learn why the rocks are red, where they came from, where they are going, and more. This hike includes the Eagle's Nest Trail for a great view of the Park and surrounding area. More than a guided hike, this is an interpretive experience for the beginner as well as advanced geologist. The hike lasts for 2 to 2 ½ hours and has a 250 feet elevation climb. Enjoy an afternoon with our knowledgeable volunteer guide who will explain the rock formations that create the scenic backdrop of Red Rock State Park. Bring water and wear suitable shoes or boots.

Arizona's famous Oak Creek meanders through Red Rock State Park creating a diverse riparian habitat for plants and wildlife. It provides the backdrop for our special hikes that are a regular part of the Park's environmental program.

Daily Guided Nature Walks, 10:00 AM: At 10:00 AM daily, visitors can join a naturalist on a guided nature walk, lasting one and a half to two hours, which will introduce them to the riparian ecosystem of Oak Creek and other aspects of the Park. Plants, wildlife, geology, history, and archeology are some of the subjects that may be discussed.

Daily Activity, 2:00 PM: At 2:00 PM daily, the Park hosts either a guest speaker or a ranger/naturalist-led activity of approximately 45 minutes. Programs may include a nature-hike, a special presentation, or an educational/nature video. This program may be an indoor or outdoor activity.

Saturday Bird Walks, 9:00 AM: On Saturday mornings at 9:00 AM during January, bird enthusiasts can join a naturalist for a "Guided Bird Walk". Beginning as well as advanced birders are welcome. Rangers recommend that visitors being their own binoculars. A limited number are available for loan from the Park.

For more information or reservations call (928) 282-6907. Red Rock State Park is located at 4050 Lower Red Rock Loop in Sedona.

Red Rock State Park will be open Thursdays through Mondays in January and closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays. In February the Park will be open 7 days a week. Park hours are 8 AM to 5 PM. Visitor Center hours are 9 AM to 5 PM.

Park Entrance Fee is $7 per vehicle for up to 4 adults, each additional adult is charged $2 each. (There is no charge for children). A $2 per person entrance fee applies to pedestrians, equestrians and bicyclists. Arizona State Parks Annual Pass is available for $50 (some restrictions apply).

For more information about the 27 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - December 4, 2009)

Holiday Gift for Families
Arizona State Parks Annual Pass

(Phoenix, Arizona - December 2, 2009) - For families looking for the perfect gift, why not get them an Annual Pass for Arizona's State Parks? It's an economical idea that gives families opportunities for memories that will last a lifetime. Many State Parks are just hours from urban areas and offer diverse and fascinating ecosystems for recreating. The history of Arizona is told in stories of the lives of many settlers who came here to find their fortunes before Arizona was a state.

To enhance park experiences, many visitors sign up as volunteers and assist in projects at their favorite park. Projects could be light trail maintenance, landscape projects, picking up litter, or doing citizen scientist projects. This is the year to make a resolution to get out into the countryside for 2010. If you plan ahead for your weekends you can get trail maps for your hikes, book ramadas for family reunions or rent a camping yurt. Use your social networking tools like Facebook to plan get-togethers on weekends, share pictures, watch birds, swim, fish, or compete to get the best pictures and then blog about memories. The Arizona State Parks Annual Pass is the perfect solution for your entire clan and it is still only $50 this year.

Go to the State Parks website for gift-giving ideas and at the same time show your support for your State Parks system by finding the perfect ornament or nature-oriented gift. There are many things to choose from on the site including; Arizona State Trails guides featuring 550 hiking trail maps, nature books, clothing and hats.

The Standard Day-Use Annual Pass (Cost: $50) allows day entrance for up to four adults. It includes all the Parks except the Colorado River Parks on weekends and holidays. A Premium Annual Day-Use Pass will still be $125 if purchased up through February 2009 and is good for weekends in the Colorado River Parks.

At Kartchner Caverns State Park, the Annual Pass allows everyone to experience the Discovery Center, picnicking and trails but not for the cave tours. Kartchner Caverns State Park offers gift certificates for cave tours, another $20 gift idea for holiday gift exchanges.

Mother Nature's gifts you find in the parks include fields of Mexican poppies, bald eagles at Fool Hollow Lake or spectacular views from the top of Picacho Peak. Visitors can camp, fish, hike, stargaze, horseback ride, and see historic reenactments. Gift recipients can swim and fish at Patagonia Lake, water ski at Lake Havasu or Lyman Lake and celebrate Earth Day at Catalina State Park. Dead Horse Ranch State Park provides adventures and learning opportunities during the annual "Verde Valley Birding & Nature Festival" and "Verde River Days" events.

Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park rustles up family fun in mid-January during the "Gathering of the Gunfighters." In February, Yuma Quartermaster Depot and Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Parks team up with the town of Yuma to celebrate "Yuma Crossing Day." In March Picacho Peak State Park holds a weekend long "Civil War in the Southwest" reenactment program. The influence of the U.S. Army on the settling of Arizona is remembered during Camp Verde's annual "Fort Verde Days." Arizona State Historic Parks offer living history programs, events, exhibits, and special activities in conjunction with their local rural communities.

Whether you are looking forward to learning more about Arizona's culture and history, or enjoying the changing seasons, giving an Annual Pass to Arizona State Parks is a holiday gift that is good for 364 days. You can order Annual passes by mail or purchase one at any of the State Parks.

For more information about the 27 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - November 30, 2009)

"Christmas Boat Parade of Lights" at Lake Havasu State Park

(Phoenix, Arizona - November 30, 2009) - The Lake Havasu 27th Annual London Bridge Yacht Club's "Boat Parade of Lights" will form in Thompson Bay, sail along the London Bridge Boat Channel and into the main lake on Friday, Dec. 4 and 5, 2009.

Bring your family to camp for the weekend at Lake Havasu State Park where you can view the parade from the Windsor 4 Beach. The Parade is scheduled to start at approximately 7 PM on both nights. This year's theme is "A Havasu Star-Spangled Christmas."

More than 50 boats festively decorated with lights and playing Christmas tunes will pass through the London Bridge Channel as the parade tours the lake. Gather the whole clan together for the night at Windsor 4 or stay for the weekend. The parade will be judged in the four categories of Corporate, Service Club, Individual/Family and Community/Civic/Youth Organization.

For more information about being an event sponsor contact Dan Remy at 928-680-4652 or see the website at www.lhcboatparadeoflights.com.

Call Lake Havasu State Park at (928) 855-2784 about camping. Day-use park fees are $10 per vehicle or an Arizona State Park Annual Pass is available for $50 (some restrictions apply). A Premium Annual Pass is available for $125 until March 1, 2010.

Lake Havasu State Park is located at 699 London Bridge Road off Highway 95 & Industrial Boulevard. The day-use hours are from Sunrise to 10 PM and checkout time for campers is 2 PM. The Park's facilities include three boat launch ramps (two for conventional watercraft, one for PWC) and a campground with 47 sites.

Most State Parks are open, however hours may have changed, so be sure to check the website before you leave for a State Park. For information about the State Parks see the calendar of events at www.AZstateparks.com or call the State Parks main office at 602-542-4174 (long distance 800-285-3703). Arizona State Parks mission is managing and conserving Arizona's natural, cultural and recreational resources for the benefit of the people, both in our Parks and through our Partnerships.



(Phoenix, AZ - November 18, 2009)

Red Rock State Park Offers Educational and Outdoor Activities

(Phoenix, Arizona - November 18, 2009 - Red Rock State Park offers a variety of educational lectures, hikes and walks for the entire family in December 2009.

On Sunday, December 6 at 2pm in the park theater, Richard and Sherry Mangum will present "The Grand Canyon-Flagstaff Stagecoach Line." Although we take the fame of the Grand Canyon for granted today, it was a little-known and seldom-visited attraction until 1892, when the Flagstaff Board of Trade and the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad Company teamed together to advertise it and make it accessible. This illustrated presentation explores the exciting beginnings of the Grand Canyon-Flagstaff Stagecoach Line. Reservations are recommended, as seating is limited. Please call (928) 282-6907.

On Sunday, December 13 at 2pm, visitors can join a volunteer on a guided geology hike through Red Rock State Park. Learn why the rocks are red, where they came from, where they are going and more. This hike includes the Eagle's Nest Trail for a great view of the park and surrounding area. More than just a guided hike, this is an interpretive experience for the beginner as well as advanced geologist. The hike lasts for 2 to 2½ hours and has a 250-foot elevation climb. Enjoy an afternoon with our knowledgeable volunteer guide as the rock formations that create the scenic backdrop of Red Rock State Park are explained. Bring water and wear suitable shoes or boots. Reservations may be required.

Every Saturday at 9am, visitors will find bird enthusiasts joining a naturalist for a "Guided Bird Walk." Beginners as well as advanced birders are welcome. Rangers recommend visitors bring their own binoculars. A limited number are available for loan from the park.

Thursdays through Mondays at 10 a.m., visitors can join a naturalist on a guided nature walk that lasts 1½ to 2 hours and will introduce them to the riparian ecosystem of Oak Creek and other aspects of the park. Plants, wildlife, geology, history and archaeology are some of the subjects that may be discussed. Depending upon conditions, on Saturdays this hike may include the Eagles Nest Trail.

Thursdays through Mondays at 2pm (except December 6), the park hosts either a guest speaker or a ranger/naturalist led activity of approximately 45-minutes. Programs may include a nature-hike, a special presentation or an educational/nature video. This program may be an indoor or outdoor activity.

Arizona's famous Oak Creek meanders through Red Rock State Park creating a diverse riparian habitat for plants and wildlife. It provides the scenic backdrop for special hikes that are a regular part of the park's environmental program.

For more information or reservations call (928) 282-6907. Red Rock State Park is located at 4050 Lower Red Rock Loop in Sedona. Park hours are 8am to 5pm.Visitor Center hours are 9am to 5pm. The Park is open Thursdays through Mondays and closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays during December.

Park Entrance Fee is $7 per vehicle for up to 4 adults, each additional adult is charged $2 each. (There is no charge for children). A $2 per person entrance fee applies to pedestrians, equestrians and bicyclists. Arizona State Parks Annual Pass is available for $50 (some restrictions apply).

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - November 24, 2009)

Flagstaff's Riordan Mansion State Historic Park Turn-of-the-Century Holiday Decor & Good Cheer

(Phoenix, Arizona - November 24, 2009) - Riordan Mansion State Historic Park dresses up for the holidays and offers tours and educational experiences in December 2009.

On Monday, December 7 at 12:15 PM, the Brown Bag Lunch Lecture will feature, "Lindbergh's Trains & Planes: The First Transcontinental Flight Route, " presented by Jerry Snow, Historian. New York to Los Angeles in an unheard-of 48 hours in 1929! And what a way to go-luxuriously appointed Ford Trimotor Airplanes, meals served aloft, and a window seat for every passenger. We show original footage from those flight and learn how close they flew to Flagstaff.

On Saturday, December 12, Riordan Mansion State Historic Park will host the annual Holiday Party and Crafts which will be held in the Visitor Center from 9 to 11:00am. Santa will be on hand to give out candy and Mrs. Claus will read Christmas stories to the children. In addition, there will be crafts for the children to make and take home, as well as Christmas music and general good cheer. To help fend off the cold, hot cider and cake will be served. The party is free to the public. The FALA Choir will perform at 10:00 AM.

During the entire month of December, Riordan Mansion State Historic Park will be festively decorated in turn-of-the-century style with wreaths, garlands, greenery and a towering fir tree trimmed with old-fashioned ornaments. Guided tours include glimpses of folklore and traditions of Christmas, both past and present. The first tour is at 11:00am and the last tour is at 4:00pm. Tour reservations are recommended. To make a tour reservation call (928) 779-4395.

The Riordan Family

Timothy and Michael Riordan were prominent pioneer Flagstaff businessmen who developed a successful logging business, the Arizona Lumber and Timber Company. The two brothers were known for their essential contributions to the development of the social and economic structure of Flagstaff and northern Arizona. Tim and Mike married the Metz sisters, Caroline and Elizabeth. Tim and Caroline had two daughters; Mike and Elizabeth had six children. The two close-knit families built a large mansion comprised of two separate homes connected by a common area known as the billiard room.

Riordan Mansion

Built in 1904 for two Riordan families, the Mansion is an impressive reminder of gracious living in a small, territorial logging town. The historic building is an Arizona treasure - a remarkable example of Arts and Crafts style architecture featuring a rustic exterior of log-slab siding, volcanic stone arches and hand-split wooden shingles. The expansive home has forty rooms, more than 13,000 square-feet of living area and servant's quarters.

For more information call Riordan Mansion State Historic Park at (928) 779-4395. The Park is located next to Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff on Riordan Road. Riordan Mansion is open 5-days a week from Thursdays through Mondays and will be closed Christmas Day. Regular entrance fees are $6 for adults, $2.50 for children aged 7 to 13, children aged 6 and younger are free.

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



(Phoenix, AZ - November 19, 2009)

Arizona State Parks Board Approves Fee Increases

At the November 13, 2009 Arizona State Parks Board meeting, the new fees recommended by staff for accessing the 30 State Parks was approved with changes taking effect on March 1, 2010.

The revised fee schedule included keeping the Premium Annual Pass which allows full access on weekends at the river parks, but increasing the fee for that pass from $125 to $200. The Standard Annual Entrance Pass which allows access to all the parks, but not weekends on the river, will be increased from $50 to $75.

In addition there will be increases for day-use and camping fees at the State Parks including an increase at Lake Havasu and Cattail Cove State Parks for day-use on weekends and state holidays from $10 to $15. For a complete listing of the fee changes go to AZstateparks.com.

For more information about the amenities at the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/ AZStateParks.



October 10 - 25

Plein Air Artist "Paint Out" at Boyce Thompson Arboretum

State Park on November 29 during the Fall Festival

(Phoenix, Arizona - November 17, 2009) - Arizona State Parks and Arizona Plein Air Painters will host a "Plein Air" Artist event at Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park on Sunday, November 29, 2009 from 8am to noon. The event will coincide with the park's Fall Festival.

Plein Air "paint outs" are an open invitation to all artists, amateur and professional, to paint and capture scenes inside Arizona State Parks. These live outdoor painting competitions take place in four-hour blocks. After the painting period, the artists meet to display the finished piece/pieces and submit them for judging by fellow artists. Artists should bring their easels, brushes, drop cloth, canvas, etc. They may also bring a mat or frame for protection and enhancement of their painting.

The top three paintings from each competition are entered in an annual gallery show. You can view an online gallery at AZStateParks.com. Following the 2009 series, the top three winners of each competition will be shown at an exhibit during January-February 2010.

The "paint outs" began as part of the State Parks' 50th anniversary celebrations, 2006-2007. Each year, Arizona State Parks hosts a series of 10 Plein Air "paint outs" at many Arizona State Parks. A gallery show of the top 30 paintings follows each series of 10 "paint outs." This program aims to be a successful collaboration between creative art societies and Arizona State Parks.

Plein Air is a French term that means in the open air. At Plein Air events landscape artists gather at a designated time to have their blank canvas stamped and then head out with packed easels, paints and brushes and trek into nature looking for inspiration in the wide open spaces with good light and fresh air to paint everyday scenery.

For more information about the "paint out" at Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park call (520) 689-2723 or visit AZStateParks.com or arizonapleinairpainters.com. The park entrance fee is waived for participating artists.

The cost is $7.50 adult admission to enter the Arboretum ($3 for ages 5-12). Boyce Thompson Arboretum is located at highway 60 milepost #223 near the historic copper mining town of Superior just 45 miles due east of Mesa or about 90 minutes drive northeast of Tucson via Oracle Road to Highway 79 north to Highway 60 east. Daily hours are 8am to 5pm.

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



October 10 - 25

Boyce Thompson Arboretum Fall Plant Sale

ARIZONA STATE PARKS
Kim Stone at (520) 689-2723
email kstone(at)ag.arizona.edu
Ellen Bilbrey at (602) 542-1996 or (602) 228-8518
Monica Enriquez at (602) 542-6997
pio(at)azstateparks.gov

(Phoenix, AZ - October 1, 2009) - Boyce Thompson Arboretum's Fall Plant Sale is October 10 - 25, 2009 and will include lectures, tours, special guests and plants!

Boyce Thompson Arboretum is the perfect place to stock up on drought-tolerant plants and October is the best month of the year to plant them. The Arboretum is the place to learn about desert gardening too, with topics ranging from edible desert plants to flowering shrubs, and from trees and perennials to bonsai. The two-week Fall Plant Sale will also feature guest appearances by local landscaping expert Tom McDonald, Sonoran Desert ecology author Gerald Rosenthal and butterfly gardener Adriane Grimaldi.

Brand new this year at the Boyce Thompson Arboretum Fall Plant Sale is the "All-In-One Hummingbird and Butterfly Garden." Arboretum nursery staff have put together collections of salvia, buddleia, penstemon and other drought tolerant plants proven to appeal to hummingbirds and butterflies. We've done the research and chosen the plants for you so you can drive home with your own do-it-yourself hummingbird and butterfly garden. What's more, butterfly tour guide Adriane Grimaldi will lead a walking tour teaching visitors about butterflies on Saturday, October 24, and then offer a slideshow and lecture about her own butterfly gardening experiences that same afternoon in the lecture room from 2 until 3:30pm.

Weekends during the Fall Plant Sale offer opportunities to meet Arboretum horticultural staff as well as volunteers from the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Master Gardener program. If you have questions about gardening, horticulture, landscaping or plant care, Arboretum staff and volunteers will have the answers.

The sale continues daily during business hours from 8am to 5pm, Saturday, October 10 through Sunday, October 25. For complete details, check out the Boyce Thompson Arboretum website at http://ag.arizona.edu/bta or call (520) 689-2723.

The cost is $7.50 adult admission to enter the Arboretum ($3 for ages 5-12), even if the visit is simply to buy plants during the plant sale event. Memberships start at $45, and can be purchased the day you visit - or download the membership form from http://arboretum.ag.arizona.edu.

Boyce Thompson Arboretum is located at highway 60 milepost #223 near the historic copper mining town of Superior just 45 miles due east of Mesa or about 90 minutes drive northeast of Tucson via Oracle Road to Highway 79 north to Highway 60 east. Daily hours are 8am to 5pm. The annual Spring Plant Sale is a fundraising event that supports programs of Boyce Thompson Arboretum.

Listen to an updated recording about tours or events by calling (520) 689-2811. To check with our staff about whether specific plants are available please call (520) 689-2723 seven days a week from 8am to 5pm.

Check out BTA's new facebook page (facebook.com/boycethompsonarboretum) and "become a fan" with a single click if you'd like frequent updates about events - and to connect with BTA members, staff, and volunteers. And bookmark the Arboretum website http://arboretum.ag.arizona.edu where you can view videos, browse photo galleries and read more about weekly nature walks and events.

Special events during the plant sale include

- "For The Love of Bonsai." This workshop and lecture will take place on two Wednesdays, October 14 and October 21. Learn the history of this intricate art form, see colorful photos, and get started with your own bonsai kit with Arboretum staffer, Master Gardener, and bonsai enthusiast Preston Cox. You'll learn that desert trees such as acacias and mesquites as well as many types of succulents make excellent bonsai plants. The October 14 lecture is included with daily admission. The Oct. 21 workshop is $32.50 for non-members and $25 for members. Participants will complete the workshop with their own potted bonsai ready to take home. Spaces are limited. Call 520-689-2723 to enroll and pre-pay for the workshop.

- Tom's Top Ten Guided Landscaping Walking Tours (check the website or call BTA for exact times and dates). East valley aspiring author and landscape expert Tom McDonald, owner of Smiling Dog Landscapes, is a popular guest at the Arboretum's annual plant sale fundraisers. The Gold Canyon resident returns this fall to lead walking tours pointing out "Tom's Top Ten" plants and trees for desert landscaping. He'll explain why plants you see in our Demonstration Garden are among his favorite desert-adapted, colorful, charismatic species for Pinal and Maricopa County landscaping. The author will also explain basic irrigation and water-saving concepts and answer questions. Bring along photos or blueprints of your yard; Tom will be happy to offer one-on-one advice following his walk.

- Saturday, October 17 "Plants-of-the-Bible" Guided Tour will be at 1:30pm. On this guided walking tour, Mesa resident and bible scholar David Oberpriller will point out palms, figs, olives, pomegranates and other plants of the bible and share his knowledge of bible botany. This two-hour tour proceeds at an easy pace along wheelchair-and-walker-accessible paths.

- Sundays, October 18 and November 15, the "Tree Tour with Terry Mikel" will be at 1:30pm. Join Terry Mikel for an insightful, often humorous afternoon as he guides a leisurely walk through the Arboretum's extensive collection of trees from arid land regions throughout the world. Terry is a recently retired horticulturist from the University of Arizona and has a lifetime of knowledge to share.

- Saturday, October 24, the Butterfly Walk will be from 9:30-11am. Learn to identify common species of butterflies and learn about the colorful insects' life cycles on a two-hour walk through the Demonstration and Hummingbird-Butterfly Gardens with Arboretum volunteer and photographer Adriane Grimaldi.

- Saturday, October 24, the Butterfly Gardening will be from 1-2:30pm in the Smith Building Lecture Room. Adriane Grimaldi will offer a 90-minute slideshow and presentation about butterfly gardening in our Lecture room.

- Saturday and Sunday, October 24 and 25, Gerald Rosenthal will present Sonoran Desert Lecture and Tour. The final weekend of the Fall Plant Sale at Boyce Thompson Arboretum includes two chances to learn about plants and animals of the Sonoran Desert from Scottsdale author Dr. Gerald A. Rosenthal. Saturday, October 24 is indoors with a one-hour lecture and Sunday, October 25 is outdoors with a guided walking tour. Rosenthal, a respected nature photographer who has spent the past 12 years exploring, studying, and recording images in the Sonoran Desert, will also be available to sign copies of his books. Meet the author at his signing table at 9-10:30am, or during his lecture and walking tour on Saturday and Sunday. Rosenthal is the author of "Sonoran Desert Life: Understanding, Insights, and Enjoyment."

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com.



FRIDAY, September 22, 2009

Maricopa County Arizona Parks Offer Free Camping

For additional information
Dawna Taylor (602) 506-1114 office
(602) 525-5733 cell

(Phoenix) - With more families opting to vacation closer to home this year due to a sluggish economy, the Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department is inviting the public to enjoy a night of free camping at a County park. Beginning Thursday, October 1, visitors who pay the camping fee for one night at a desert mountain County park will receive the next night of equal value for free.

"This is a wonderful opportunity for residents to experience the beauty of their County parks. The parks are located on the outskirts of town and provide access to some of the most breathtaking scenery and views found in the Sonoran desert," stated Chairman Max Wilson, Maricopa County Board of Supervisor, District 4.

"Parks will honor this offer until Thursday, November 12. As an added bonus for our customers, we've asked the interpretive rangers to offer additional nighttime programming opportunities and activities that are fun for the whole family," added R.J. Cardin, Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Director.

Participating parks include

1. Cave Creek Regional Park. Located north of Phoenix, this park offers the illusion of being miles away from civilization. The campground has 38 individual developed campsites.

2. Estrella Mountain Regional Park. Located near the meeting of the Gila and Agua Fria Rivers in the southwest Valley, the park includes a large wetland area. The park also offers seven developed campsites.

3. McDowell Mountain Regional Park. Nestled in the lower Verde River basin, this park is a desert jewel in the northeast Valley. This park has 76 developed campsites that are perfect for RV or tent camping.

4. Usery Mountain Regional Park. Located on the Valley's east side, this park is located at the western end of the Goldfield Mountains, adjacent to the Tonto National Forest. The park offers 74 individual developed campsites which can accommodate either an RV or tent camping.

5. White Tank Mountain Regional Park. At nearly 30,000 acres, this is the largest regional park in Maricopa County. Most of the park is made up of the rugged and beautiful White Tank Mountains on the Valleys west side. The park offers 40 individual semi-developed campsites.

At approximately 120,000 acres, Maricopa County is home to one of the largest regional park system in the United States. The parks are located throughout the county and are all within a 45-minute drive from downtown Phoenix. Some restrictions do apply. To learn more about this offer or a County park, visit www.maricopa.gov/parks or phone (602) 506-2930.

Restrictions

1. Guests who arrive after the entry station has closed must write "buy one, get one free" on the front of the envelope to receive the free night offer. Refunds will not be given to individuals who do not mention the promotional offer on their envelopes or at the entry station.

2. All campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted.

3. Offer not valid for group campground reservations or unit fees.

4. Limit of one free night per family, household and/or group in a seven day period (Monday through Sunday).

5. Rain checks will not be issued if space is not available.

6. Offer not valid at Lake Pleasant Regional Park.

7. Offer valid Thursday, October 1, through Thursday, November 12, 2009.

Dawna L. Taylor
Public Information Officer
Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department
234 N. Central Avenue, Ste. 6400
Phoenix, Arizona 85004
(602) 506-1114
(602) 506-4692 - fax
(602) 525-5733 - cell

From hiking on a barrier-free trail, to horseback riding along a creek, Maricopa County Parks offer visitors the best of the Sonoran Desert. To learn more, visit the Parks Website at www.maricopa.gov/parks!



FRIDAY, September, 11, 2009

ARIZONA STATE PARKS BOARD MAKES CHANGES IN MANAGEMENT OF PARKS DUE TO BUDGET REDUCTIONS

Today the Arizona State Parks Board accepted management recommendations presented by staff to balance the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 State Parks budget. "With the loss of all state General Fund monies, and conservation funds which have been transferred over to the General Fund, the department only has $19.3 million to operate," said Parks Board Chairman Reese Woodling.

"This budget is a 27% reduction from FY 2009 and approximately 25 - 30 employees will be laid off throughout the agency. Some parks operations will be reduced to high season months, five-day a week, or be open only for special events and other uses. (see website for individual park recommendations.) Those changes will begin as of October 1, 2009. Now all of the funds to operate the State Parks department must be earned through gate fees or come from the remaining conservation funds," said Executive Director Renee Bahl. "In November the Board will also be voting on the park user fee proposals made by the staff. To increase revenues, we will work with the Treasurer's office to modify our investment strategies to maximize interest income."

"Our goal is to keep as many parks open as possible and draw the 2.3 million visitors to the parks so they spend their vacations in Arizona and support those rural economies. The State Parks $266 million economic impact in tourism is critical for these towns and we are meeting with local governments and private sector partners to help keep the parks open as much as possible," said Bahl. "We are also seeking volunteers to assist with some of the day-to-day operations at the parks and welcome the public's input on how to keep the park system operating during these dire times." The Federal Recreational Trails grant program and Growing Smarter State Trust Land Acquisition Grants were approved as presented for many important land conservation projects. (see website for details on grants.)

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



FRIDAY, September, 11, 2009

ARIZONA STATE PARKS BOARD MEETING

(Phoenix, AZ - September 9, 2009) - The Arizona State Parks Board will be meeting on September 11, 2009 starting at 10am at the Peoria City Council Chamber located at 8401 W. Monroe Street. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda is posted at http://azstateparks.com/board.

Staff estimates an operating shortfall of $1.5 million for FY 2010 and therefore is aggressively pursuing all measures to increase revenues or decrease operating costs, including: discussions with cities and counties about partnerships, higher interest earnings through investment strategies, and increased park gate fees. Approximately 25-30 full-time positions must be eliminated to balance the $19.3 million 2010 operating budget. Agency operating adjustments will take effect October 1 if approved.

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free 800-285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - August 28, 2009

HUMMINGBIRD PROGRAM IN ARIZONA STATE PARKS NEEDS CITIZEN SCIENTIST VOLUNTEERS TO WATCH BIRDS

(Phoenix, AZ -- August 28, 2009) The Arizona State Parks department, Audubon Arizona and the Hummingbird Monitoring Network (HMN) are launching an effort to collect scientific information about hummingbird species in Arizona. The project is funded by a grant provided by TogetherGreen.org, an Audubon conservation initiative made possible by funding and assistance from Toyota.

The project includes regional biodiversity studies and investigation about the distribution and migration of hummingbirds. (see hummonnet.org.) The diversity and abundance of hummingbirds in the SW United States, southern Canada, and northern Mexico will provide land managers with information that will help protect natural habitats.

The grant partners hope the program will inspire more conservation support as these citizen scientists collect important scientific results for this transamerican research program.

Utilizing State Parks in Arizona for scientific study, where professional staff can oversee intense programs, is common for researchers and nonprofits as well as Arizona's universities. The State Parks system includes natural areas that are highly protected, managed, and critical biomes in Arizona.

Several years ago, Dr. Bob Casavant, the Research and Science Manager for State Parks, teamed up with Dr. Susan Wethington of the Hummingbird Network to increase our knowledge about hummingbirds. They realized that State Parks/Natural Areas are perfect settings for conducting three and four-dimensional scientific research in outdoor laboratories while also educating children and adults about science.

Sonoita Creek Natural Area near Patagonia has been monitoring birds since January and Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park will be a feeder-watch opportunity for new volunteers this fall. The Verde River Greenway Natural Area near Cottonwood, has also been designated by Audubon as an "Important Bird Area" and will be the next Park looking for citizen scientists. These State Parks will all offer high profile hummingbird conservation education events to engage the public in this volunteer research opportunity.

Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park, just an hour east of Phoenix, will launch its program on September 5th with a one-hour guided walk to learn about hummingbirds, a lecture and a slideshow. The event will be from 8:30 to 11 am. The presentation and program is free but park day use entrance fees will apply. (call 520-689-2723 for more information.)

Arizona State Parks Resource Ecologist, Joanne Roberts, will introduce the hummingbird project. "I'll cover the ecology, life history and the science involved with migratory conservation. In the future we will be asking volunteers to help by observing birds for an hour or two, identifying them and taking field notes once-a-week. Hmmmm.... watching hummingbirds in the gardens at Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park.... sounds like a great way to get involved with volunteering, right?"

If you like to find out more about being a citizen scientist and a hummingbird feeder-watch volunteer, read about the Arizona State Parks Rim Project at www.azstateparks.com/volunteer/v_rimproject.html Or call State Parks headquarters at (602) 542-4174. www.AZstateparks.gov. Follow us: twitter.com/AZStateParks



Phoenix, AZ - August 19, 2009

Aldo Leopold Celebration at Red Rock State Park September 20

This year, Arizona State Parks, in conjunction with the states of Arizona and New Mexico and the Aldo Leopold Foundation, are celebrating Aldo Leopold's arrival in the southwest (in Springerville, Arizona in 1909). Arizona State Parks has been holding events throughout the year at different parks. The next centennial event will be held at Red Rock State Park on Sunday, September 20 from 8am to 5pm (see complete schedule below).

Aldo Leopold is considered by many as the Father of Wildlife Management in the United States and his literary works are used in most Universities in the field of Natural Resources. He was born in 1887 and died in 1948 and was an ecologist, forester, and environmentalist. Leopold was influential in the development of modern environmental ethics and in the movement for wilderness preservation. For a good introduction to Leopold's time in Arizona check out "Aldo Leopold's Southwest," a collection of 26 essays by Leopold. Leopold's most famous book, "A Sand County Almanac," contains insightful and moving nature-related essays related to his outdoor experiences. His biography is called "Aldo Leopold: A Fierce Green Fire."

The goal of the centennial celebration is to promote Leopold's vision that an ethical relationship with the land is essential to a vibrant and healthy community. The theme of this yearlong celebration is the relevance of Leopold's Land Ethic to how we address today's pressing environmental issues and make policy decisions about our future. Our goal is to engage the citizens of our community in the meaningful commitment to promise our children the inheritance of a beautiful and healthy physical environment.

For more information, visit the State Parks website at http://azstateparks.com/find/aldo_calendar.html

Red Rock State Park is located at 4050 Lower Red Rock Loop in Sedona.

Aldo Leopold Centennial Celebration
Red Rock State Park Celebrates Aldo Leopold
with Guest Speaker Kim Stone
Sunday, September 20, 2009

Schedule of Events
Reservations required for 2pm speaker, call (928) 282-6907
8am Park Opens
10am Guided Nature Walk with volunteer naturalist
2pm Chautauqua Speaker Kim Stone as Aldo Leopold
5pm Park Closes

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStatePark



Phoenix, Arizona - August 18, 2009

Protect the River's Riparian Habitat at Verde River Days September 26-27 Dead Horse Ranch State Park

Dead Horse Ranch State Park will celebrate its annual Verde River Days on Saturday, September 26th and Sunday, September 27th, 2009.

The activities during Verde River Days promote preservation and care of the environment by showcasing informative exhibits on the Verde's riparian habitat. Some of the day's events include environmental exhibits, hands-on-activities, fishing, canoeing and live entertainment.

The exhibit area opens at 9am and the opening ceremony officially begins Verde River Days at 10am on Saturday, September 26th. The celebration brings together 40-plus nature-based exhibits, sandcastle building, a menagerie of live animals, non-stop activities from canoe rides (with or without assistance), to nature hikes, as well as continuous entertainment and local food vendors.

Guests of all ages are welcome to fish in the lagoon. Fishing licenses are not required during the scheduled Arizona Game & Fish Department's clinic hours. Poles, bait, and tackle are provided for all ages. Visitors may also experience nature's history through guided nature walks and short hikes. View dozens of teardrop and vintage trailers of yesteryear that will be on exhibit throughout the weekend.

Live demonstrations will include American Civil War encampments, drills, and battles, circa 1863. Visitors are invited to tour the period camps, talk with the reenactors, and watch the battles scheduled for 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday, and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Sunday.

On Sunday, September 27th the Verde River Citizens Alliance will sponsor canoe rides down the Verde River. Groups will depart from the Dead Horse Ranch River Day Use Area at 8 a.m. and again at 10 a.m. The rides last about an hour and a half. Canoers will be shuttled back to the park. Pre-registration is required. To schedule a trip or for more information contact Marsha Foust at 928-634-8738.

The park entrance fee is $6 per vehicle with up to 4 adults, and $2 for bicycle or walk in. The camping fee (at Dead Horse Ranch) is $12 or $19 with hookups. For more information about Verde River Days call the Cottonwood Chamber of Commerce at (928) 634-7593 or visit AZStateParks.com.

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - August 7, 2009

ARIZONA STATE PARKS & PAYSON EXTEND PARTNERSHIP TO KEEP TONTO NATURAL BRIDGE STATE PARK OPEN

Tonto Natural Bridge State Park will be open the next five weekends (Sat/Sun) through Labor Day weekend (Sept 5-7) from 8am-7pm. In order to keep Tonto Natural Bridge open on these weekends all summer, City of Payson Mayor Ken Evans and local partners agreed to fund the positions necessary to keep the park operating.

"This City/State Parks partnership has resulted in approximately 15,500 people coming to Tonto Natural Bridge State Park in three months who then spend monies in the local communities for gas, food, lodging, and gifts," said Executive Director Renee Bahl. "Now we are looking to partner with other cities, counties and businesses as well to find ways to help us maintain the same operating hours of the State Parks for the visitors in the upcoming year," she said.

"The historic lodge at Tonto Natural Bridge which is under structural repair right now, is scheduled to be completed by October. However, due to additional budget reductions the Parks Board is evaluating the entire agency's budget and functions. The next Parks Board meeting is September 11 and Board members will make decisions at that meeting on how to operate the park system with only $19 million compared to $26 million budgeted in July of 2008. "The General Fund has been reduced to zero and other monies, such as gate fees were swept into state coffers," said Bahl.

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - August 4, 2009

Arizona State Parks Welcomes New Board Member

Arizona State Parks welcomes Maria Baier as the newest Board Member. Baier was appointed by Governor Jan Brewer to be the State Land Commissioner, and as part of that job capacity, will sit on the State Parks Board.

Most recently, Baier served on the Phoenix City Council where she chaired the Economy, Commerce and Sustainability Subcommittee. She also served on the Downtown and Aviation Subcommittee, Housing and Neighborhoods Subcommittee, Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee, the League of Arizona Cities and Towns Executive Committee and the Maricopa Association of Governments Transportation Policy Committee.

Baier spent the past several years as President of MBC, Inc. a sustainability consulting firm specializing in sustainable land use and natural resource management practices. Prior to that, she was President and CEO of Valley Partnership, a trade organization whose primary mission is to "advocate responsible development" primarily on behalf of the commercial real estate development. She also worked for the Trust for Public Land, a national non-profit land conservation organization, as director of the Arizona Field Office.

Additionally, Baier spent ten years on the Executive Staff of the Office of the Governor, serving two administrations. She served as Senior Policy Advisor in the areas of natural resources, growth and development, environmental quality and criminal justice. During that time, she was liaison to Arizona State Parks.

She is an active member of the Arizona State Bar and volunteers on numerous state boards and commissions including the Trust for Public Land Arizona Advisory Board, Great Hearts Academies Board of Directors, Valley Partnership Board of Directors, Agricultural Protection Commission and Central Arizona Partnership Board of Directors.

She received her Bachelor of Arts Degree from the College of Liberal Arts at Arizona State University in Tempe and went on to receive her Juris Doctor from the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - August 3, 2009

Arizona State Parks Department Adopts a Reduced Operating Budget for 2010

According to State Parks Board Chair Reese Woodling, "Today the Board approved the 2010 operating budget down from $26 million to $19.3 million. All of that money now is coming from conservation taxes and park-earned monies with none from the state's General Fund budget. This is not a sustainable budget to keep the parks and programs operating, so we have hard decisions about how to fund each one."

"This $19M is also contingent on the enactment of the Budget Reconciliation Bill which would authorize the agency to use certain special funds for normal operating. Heritage Fund grants were recommended to be reinstated, but that is also contingent upon a favorable Joint Legislative Budget Committee review to allow internal fund transfers," said Woodling.

"Now our staff will be looking for all different types of partners to keep the parks open in these rural communities. In September our staff will be presenting scenarios for salvaging the State Parks and programs. We will have to drastically reduce our expenses to meet the extremely low budget presented today," said Renée Bahl, the State Parks Executive Director.

The next meeting for the State Parks Board will be Friday, September 11 at the City of Peoria. For more information call (602) 542-4174 or visit http://azstateparks.com/board

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.



Phoenix, AZ - August 3, 2009

ARIZONA STATE PARKS DEPARTMENT CHOOSES TO MAKE SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN OPERATING THE AGENCY AND STATE PARKS OF ARIZONA

According to State Parks Board Chair Reese Woodling, "Today the Board approved the 2010 operating budget down from $26 million to $19.3 million. All of that money now is coming from conservation taxes and park-earned monies with none from the state's General Fund budget. This is not a sustainable budget to keep the parks and programs operating, so we have hard decisions about how to fund each one."

"This $19M is also contingent on the enactment of the Budget Reconciliation Bill which would authorize the agency to use certain special funds for normal operating. Heritage Fund grants were recommended to be reinstated, but that is also contingent upon a favorable Joint Legislative Budget Committee review to allow internal fund transfers," said Woodling.

"Now our staff will be looking for all different types of partners to keep the parks open in these rural communities. In September our staff will be presenting scenarios for salvaging the State Parks and programs. We will have to drastically reduce our expenses to meet the extremely low budget presented today," said Renée Bahl, the State Parks Executive Director.

The next meeting for the State Parks Board will be Friday, September 11 at the City of Peoria. For more information call (602) 542-4174 or visit http://azstateparks.com/board

For more information about the 30 State Parks, statewide hiking opportunities, off-highway vehicle trails, and other outdoor recreational and cultural opportunities in Arizona, call (602) 542-4174 (outside of the Phoenix metro area call toll-free (800) 285-3703) or visit AZStateParks.com. Follow us on twitter.com/AZStateParks.











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